Study Guides (248,398)
Canada (121,510)
Psychology (1,235)
PSY2106 (21)

PSYC2106 Notes.docx

17 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY2106
Professor
Heather Poole
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 1  09/05/2013 1.3  Descriptive Statistics A statement about a finding would be a descriptive statistic. I.e., the average 13 year old girl spends 25  minutes thinking about her favourite band a day, crime rates, and dieting scores  Inferential Statistics: Statistics where you infer a conclusion from a sample of the population  Population: the complete set of events in which you are interested  Sample: The smaller group, ideally randomly selected, which is tested to try and get an idea of how the  population as a whole responds to a certain stimuli  Statistics: the numerical values based on the observations drawn from a sample  Parameters: How the values correspond to the population as a whole  Descriptive Statistics: Describe the set of data on hand  Inferential Statistics: use statistics to infer values of parameters  Random Sample: A sample in which each member of the population has an equal and independent  chance of being selected as part of the sample 1.4 Decision tree: a graphical representation of the decisions involved to choose statistical procedures  Measurement data (quantitative data): Data obtained by measuring objects or events  Categorical data: data representing counts or number of observations in each category (74 people  said red was their favourite colour, 34 said blue was)    Chapter 2  09/05/2013 2.1  Chapter 2  09/05/2013 Measurements: the assignment of numbers to objects  Scales of measurement: characteristics of relations among numbers assigned to objects  S. S. Stevens:  Very influential psychologist who defined the four types of scales: nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio.  Nominal scales: numbers used onto to distinguish among objects (pinnies during sports games)  Generally used for classification in experiments (1 = males, 2 = females)  Ordinal scales: Numbers used only to place objects in order  If you won first, second, or third in a race, that number would be an ordinal scale  Interval Scale: a measurement on which equal intervals between objects represent equal differences  (the differences are meaningful)  If you have a 95 on a test and your friend has an 85, you have an interval of 10 between you and your friend  Ratio Scale: a scale with a true zero point where the ratios are meaningful.  Someone going 40 km/h is going twice as fast as someone going 20 km/h 2.2 Variables: properties of objects or events that can take different values  Discrete Variables: Variables that take on a small set of possible values  Gender, marital status, number of computers, etc  Continuous variables: Variables that take on any value Chapter 2  09/05/2013 Speed, amount of milk produced by a cow, etc  Independent variables: the variable that is manipulated by the experimenter  Dependent variable: the variable that is measured, known as the data or the score  2.3 Random Sampling: when every subject of the population has an equal and independent chance of  being selected for a study  Generally it is hard to find a completely random sample, especially when trying to study the behaviours of a  large population, so instead experimenters just try to eliminate biases as much as possible i.e., don’t look at how sexually active women are by only surveying women who have used planned  parenthood services in the last 12 months  Random Assignment: the process of assigning subjects at random to groups  Chapter 3 09/05/2013 3.1 Frequency distribution: a way of sorting data in terms of how often certain values of a dependent  variable were achieved Bar graphs Real lower limit or real upper limit: the upper and lower bounds for an interval (for instance, the  interval for genius in IQ is from 130­140)  Midpoint: center of the interval; average of the upper and lower limits  Histogram: graph in which a rectangle is used to represent frequencies of observations within each  interval (kinda like a bar graph)  Helpful when dealing with large groups, when able to be grouped into intervals (like dealing with SAT  scores)  Useful for finding outliers. They show the weird, abnormal results. Scores don’t gradually go to the outlier,  and they are usually in a different category. The outliers are afterwards dismissed from the results  3.2 Stem­and­leaf display: graphical display presenting original data arranged into a histogram  Good way to create a histogram without any graphing software  When you have unusual scores, write a stem called “high or low” and then the stem is the leaf is the entire  value  Exploratory Data Analysis: (EDA) a set of techniques developed by John Tukey for presenting data  in visually meaningful ways  Leading digits: Leftmost digits of a number (significant digits) Stem: Vertical axis of display containing the leading digits  Trailing digits: Digits to the right of the leading digits (least significant digits) Leaves: Horizontal axis of display containing the trailing digits Chapter 3 09/05/2013 Bins are always at equal increments—they are the X axis, and make up the categories the Y values fall  into  3.3 Bar graph: a graph in which the frequency of occurrence of different values of X is represented by the  height of a bar  Indicates averages of scores between categories (women scored 70, men scored 50)  Line graph: a graph in which the Y values corresponding to different X values are connected by a line  When you aren’t working with categories, but the data is continuous  Scatterplots: for correlational studies; each individual has their X and Y score plotted on a graph,  depicted by a single dot.  Find the line of best fit when necessary  3.5 Symmetric: having the same shape on both sides of the center  Bimodal: a distribution having two distinct peaks Unimodal: a distribution having one distinct peak  Modality: the number of meaningful peaks in a frequency distribution of the data  Negatively skewed: a distribution that trails off to the left  Positively skewed: a distribution that trails off to the right  Skewness: a measure of the degree to which a distribution is asymmetrical 3.6 Central Tendencies of Measurement  09/05/2013 4.1 Central Tendencies of Measurement  09/05/2013 Mode: the most commonly occurring score  Unimodal: only one mode Bimodal: two modes Multimodal: multiple modes Advantages Not swayed by outliers It’s a real number in the data Helpful for trying to figure out which score is most common (not what’s the average, but actually most  common)  4.2 Median: the middle score of the set of data  The 50  percentile  Is not swayed by outliers  Is helpful because the intervals between scores do not have to be even Disadvantage is that it doesn’t enter into equations that well and so is harder to work with than the mean  The median isn’t necessarily a value in the data set  4.3 Central Tendencies of Measurement  09/05/2013 Mean: the average of all the scores in a data set  Signified as X with a line over it  Most common method of measuring central tendency  Influenced by extreme scores  Value may not actually be a score (could be something none of the subjects actually got as t
More Less

Related notes for PSY2106

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit