Study Guides (234,064)
Canada (112,948)
Psychology (1,159)
PSY3105 (19)
Quiz

Personal quiz notes

10 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of Ottawa
Department
Psychology
Course
PSY3105
Professor
Jocelyn Wentland
Semester
Fall

Description
Love and Sexuality 12/03/2013 Gender Identity = psychological sense of being female or male; may not match our anatomy 18 months (1.5 years) =  children HAVE a sense of their ANATOMIC gender. 3 years =  children have firm sense of gender identity. 3 to 7/8 yrs i.e Early Childhood  = children interested in anatomy; often SAME­gender groups; sex  play by showing each other genitals. 9­13 yrs i.e. readolescence  = less interested in sex; preoccupied with bodies; Peer pressure in  terms of dress codes, using correct slang; Peer disapproval is an INTENSE PUNISHMENT; towards END of  preadolescence they begin to take part in EXPLORATIVE sex play i.e. mutual display of genitals and  touching genitals; “Spin the bottle”; Among heterosexuals – increased interest in other sex individuals. Age of consent = age that a person can legally consent to sexual activity Legal age of consent is 16; used to be 14. Exceptions: 12/13 if other person is LESS than 2 years older (i.e. less than 15 years old) 14/15 if other person is LESS than 5 years older (i.e. 20 years old) 14/15; you can have sex with whomever if you are married to the individual (to get  married in Ontario you need parental consent if under age of 18) Teen Pregnancy in Canada Canadian rate half of United states rate BUT significantly higher than that of northern Euro countries. Higher teen pregnancy if LACKING: Comprehensive sex education. Knowledge about he economical advantages of delaying childbearing. Social equalities. Acceptance of youth sexuality. Availability of contraceptives and protection and anonymous services. Why Teens engage in risky sexual behavior: Brain not fully developed (emotional) Optimistic bias –“it won’t happen to me” Misinformation – perception of LOW risk Perceived self­esteem Role models STIs – asymptomatic (i.e. experience no symptoms) Alcohol/drugs BOYS Earlier age: Infrequent sex Lower sexual satisfaction Low function relating to sexual desire and orgasm Later age: Fears of sex Avoid sex Lack confidence about having sex Infrequent sex Lower sexual satisfaction GIRLS  Earlier age: Less positive experience More feelings of regret. Later age: More likely to avoid sex Lack confidence about having sex Infrequent sex Lower sexual satisfaction BOYS GIRLS 1. Loss of inexperience 1. Loss of virginity 2. Rite of passage 2. Reputation concerns 3. Becoming a man 3. Feelings of guilt 4 factors that influence LIKING: 1. PROXIMITY a. Increased opportunity to meet people close to us b. Mere Exposure (individuals we are more frequently exposed to, we are more likely to become  friends and/or romantic partners with); e.g. people we sit next to in uni for a whole year. 2. SIMILARITY a. People attracted to others who are similar to them – consensual validation confirms the  way we think about the world i.e. confirms our schemas (to find consensus with their  own characteristics, because this allows the individual to validate their own  way of looking at the world ) – e.g. having common religious beliefs allows you to get  along better rather than one being religious and the other being atheist. This minimizes  frequency of collisions.  b. Genetic survival ­ Respond favorably to people who are likes us because we have similar  genes. c. Reinforces our thoughts, beliefs and values. 3.Physiological Arousal a. Greater arousal in situations where there is higher anxiety. b. Bridge study suggested that sexual content of stories written by subjects on the SHAKY  BRIDGE and their tendency to call the woman experimenter was SIGNIFICANTLY GREATER. 3. Physical Attractiveness a. What we find attractive is influenced by CULTURE b. Why are we attracted to beauty? i. EVOLUTIONARY 1. Sign of fitness i. BEAUTIFUL­Is­Good STEREOTYPE 1. Association of beauty with desirable personality characteristics. What does social psychology tell us about attraction? PROXIMITY:  You can not meet someone if you stay home (hang out around places the people you think  you like hang out). SIMILARITY:  Talk to like­minded people AROUSAL:  Go on a first date that gets your HEART RACING (i.e. not a boring restaurant). PHYSICAL APPEARANCE:  Conform to cultural standards (difficult to modify facial symmetry)  ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS Why care about relationships? One of BEST predictors of happiness. Positively influence HEALTH Live longer Deal with stressors better 3 QUESTIONS 1. What is “love” and what role does it play in relationships? a. an IDEAL b. a FEELING c. a COMMITMENT d. an ATTACHEMENT e. a PROCESS (falling in love) f. a state of BEING (in love) g. a requirement, a social norm, an evolved mechanism, a choice, something we can not control? 3 brain systems: a. sex drive b. romantic love c. attachment (Security, calm, connection to a partner). 2. What about Sex? a. Sexual desire/attraction is key feature that differentiates romantic
More Less

Related notes for PSY3105

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit