CCT210H5 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Glossary Of Professional Wrestling Terms, Upper Class, Paralanguage

235 views13 pages
Published on 5 Oct 2017
School
UTM
Department
Communication, Culture and Technology
Course
CCT210H5
Part I: Short Definitions (4 x 5% = 20%)
You will identify four terms that you will choose from a list of five. Be sure to use complete sentences and support
your answer with examples wherever possible. These are the terms you should study for the midterm:
Syntext: (lecture 4)
- A text that imparts the illusion of connectivity among what would be perceived as fragmented random texts by simply
synthesizing them in an organized fashion.
- At the level of the signifier, newspapers are perceptibly different
- The Toronto Sun vs. The Globe and Mail
- Website: the random setting connect together by syntext
- Play lots of roles, to inform us what’s going on; a social sole
- Syntext seems that they don’t seems connected, we then perceived it as related, come together as an organized fashion
- Newspaper may not connect to each other, Read newspaper as meaningful syntext, read all together that the
newspaper is meaningful, has meaning toward you,
- Instant news reports
A text that imparts the illusion of connectivity among what would otherwise be perceived as fragmented random texts by
simply synthesizing them in an organized fashion.
Binary Oppositions: (lecture 2)
- Theoretical opposite, helps us to naturalize our thoughts
- Western culture depends on it all the time
- Is full of value
- One is always superior (man, white); one is perceived as inferior (woman, black)
A pair of related terms or concepts that are opposite in meaning. It is the contrast between two terms that are completely
theoretically opposite, such as on and off, up and down, left and right.
Modality judgment: (lecture 3)
- Modality: the reality status accorded to or claimed by a sign, text or genre.
- In making sense of a text, we make “modality judgments”, based on our knowledge of the world and of the medium.
- The media which are typically judged to be the most ‘realistic’ are photographic - especially film and television.
- Example: Superman
- a formulate pattern
- reoccurring in a formula organization
To make sense of a text, we make modality judgment based on our knowledge of the world and the medium. Refers
to the speakers’ strength of inference or degree of confidence in the proposition expressed. It refers to the way speakers
communicate their doubts, certainties, Judgment modality refers in specific to the speaker’s confidence to the proposition
and relates to terms that aren’t definite. Eg. Being doubtful rather than certain, providing words such as “it may have
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 13 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
rather than “it had”, or “it must haveinstead of “it should have”. Judgment modality is one’s personal rationality rather
than based on facts.
Polysemy: (lecture 4)
- focus put on audiences, marketing research, want reach the largest market audience through a dominant mode,
through general codes
The term given to words and signs to have multiple related meanings. Eg. The word “getcan have many meanings, such
as ‘procure’ (I’ll get the food), “become(He got the job), “have(I’ve got hiccups), “understand(I get it).
Projection:
- People project their own unconscious feelings onto other people or objects, they see in other people aspects of
themselves reflected back.
Mediagenic moments: (lecture 4) (P.345-366)
- Viewers have been trained to see the world in news through established news frames. They encounter these frames
visually through memorable ‘mediagenic’ moments rather than complex socio-political processes. And they are
trained to receive these in terms of the reality of news.
How viewers are trained to see the world through appealing visual news frames.
Part II: Short Answer (3 x 10% = 30%)
You will answer three short questions that you will choose from a list of five. Be sure to use complete sentences and
support your answer with examples.
1. At around the same time Saussure was formulating his model of the sign, Charles Sanders Peirce formulated
his own model of the sign. Discuss the two models, giving examples for each, and explaining both their similarities
and how they differ. (lecture 1)
Saussure
- uses a two part model:
- He defined a sign as being composed of:
- a ‘signifier’ - the form which the sign takes; and
- the ‘signified’ - the concept it represents.
- The sign is the whole that results from the association of the signifier with the signified
Example:
- “Open”
- Signifier: the word “open”
- Signified the concept that the shop is “openfor business
- Remember that you as the shopper/the person reading the sign have invested it with meaning
‘Value’ of the Sign
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 13 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
- Saussure refers to as the ‘value’ of a sign depends on its relations with other signs within the system
- In other words, Saussure believes that a sign has no ‘absolute’ value independent of this context.
- Chess game analogy.
- What is signified then clearly depends on the relationship between the two parts of the sign, the value of a sign is
determined by the relationships between the sign and other signs within the system as a whole.
‘Arbitrarinessof the Sign
- Saussure argues that there is no necessary, intrinsic, direct or inevitable relationship between the signifier and the
signified.
- Agreed to be convention
- e. g. TREE
- What about TREE vs. FREE
- Important to Note:
- This does not suggest that all signifying systems are socially or historically arbitrary
- e.g. Language
- e.g. Red for traffic light
- the sign is arbitrary a priori but ceases to be arbitrary a posteriori - after the sign has come into historical existence it
cannot be arbitrarily changed
Peirce
- Has a three part model:
- The Representamen: the form which the sign takes (not necessarily material) = to Saussure’s signifier;
- An Interpretant: not an interpreter but rather the sense made of the sign = to Saussure’s signified;
- An Object: to which the sign refers (not in Saussure’s model).
PEIRCE EXAMPLE:
- A Traffic Light sign for “Stop”
1. The red light facing traffic is the “Representamen”
2. The idea that a red light indicated that vehicles must stop is the “Interpretant”
3. The vehicles actually stopping are the “Object(the object as represented in the representamen). *Remember:
The object does not have to be real or physical.
A FUNDAMENTAL DIVISION OF PEIRCE’S SIGNS
- Symbol/symbolic: a mode in which the signifier does not resemble the signified but which is fundamentally arbitrary
or purely conventional - so that the relationship must be learnt: e.g. language, alphabetical letters, numbers, morse
code, traffic lights, national flags
- Icon/iconic: a mode in which the signifier is perceived as resembling or imitating the signified (recognizably looking,
sounding, feeling, tasting or smelling like it) - being similar in possessing some of its qualities: e.g. a portrait,
imitative gestures (putting your hand up showing “Stop”)
- Index/indexical: a mode in which the signifier is not arbitrary but is directly connected in some way to the signified -
this link can be observed or inferred: e.g. smoke is an index to fire, pain is an index to illness.
- The interaction between the representamen, the object and the interpretant is referred to by Peirce as ‘semiosis’
- Semiosis then is the comprehension and production of signs
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 13 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Part i: short definitions (4 x 5% = 20%) You will identify four terms that you will choose from a list of five. Be sure to use complete sentences and support your answer with examples wherever possible. These are the terms you should study for the midterm: A text that imparts the illusion of connectivity among what would be perceived as fragmented random texts by simply synthesizing them in an organized fashion. At the level of the signifier, newspapers are perceptibly different. Website: the random setting connect together by syntext. Play lots of roles, to inform us what"s going on; a social sole. Syntext seems that they don"t seems connected, we then perceived it as related, come together as an organized fashion. Newspaper may not connect to each other, read newspaper as meaningful syntext, read all together that the newspaper is meaningful, has meaning toward you,

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.