PSY311H5 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Hypochondriasis, Psychopathology, Protective Factor

81 views7 pages
Published on 18 Jun 2012
School
UTM
Department
Psychology
Course
PSY311H5
PSY311 Final Exam April 2011
1a) Describe the behavioural profile of rejected children. (Lec. 3)
- They have much disruptive behaviour e.g. a child who peers don’t want to play basketball
with because last time he/he played, they took the ball and ran away
- They are argumentative and antisocial
- They are extremely active e.g. kids with ADHD are very active and tend to be more
disruptive
- They are talkative people who talk non-stop get annoying
- They try frequent attempts at social approaches they always try to join the group without
understanding the situation and how to act in the situation which can get very annoying
- They part-take in little cooperative play, and are unwilling to share
- They have much solitary activity
- They often have inappropriate behaviours e.g. when a child isn’t being accepted into a
group, they might end up bullying their way into the group
1b) Paul is 6 and James is 10. What kind of peer relationship is this? In what ways is it both
similar and different from same-age peer relationships and adult-child relationships? (Lec. 3)
- This is a friendship type of peer relationship
o Paul and James are friends who share a special bond
- Paul and James relationship is a vertical relationship; it is similar to an adult-child
relationship because vertical relationship when two individuals are of different ages. The
vertical relationship is different from horizontal relationship (same age peer relationship),
which is when two individuals are of the same age.
- This is different from the same age relationship because there will more likely be unequal
interactions between James and Paul. Since James is older he will play the lead role in their
interactions
o Same age peer relationships are usually brief, freer and more equal
o Paul and James will engage in reciprocal actions, their friendship specifically can be
referred to as a dyadic relationship where they experience reciprocal likings.
o They will also have more social exchanges due to their age difference
- Adult- child relationships are also very unequal in that the adult usually takes the lead, the
child expects high degree of reciprocal liking and responsiveness from the adult than another
child.
o Children are not concerned about how they display themselves (socially) in adult
child interactions as they don’t fear as much rejection and neglected compared to peer
relationships.
1c) Describe the trends in the development of infants’ (first year) peer relationships. (Lec. 3)
- At 3 months babies take interest in other babies children show first few signs of empathy,
interest and noticing one another
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-2 of the document.
Unlock all 7 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
- After 6 months children show unreciprocated approaches (e.g. handing out toys, no eye
contact and no return of object)
- They have difficulty linking behaviour to that of their partner; social contacts are largely one
way affairs
Second year onwards Developmental Trends toddlers (extra)
- Peer relationships are more frequent and complex
- Reciprocal play is frequent
- Incorporation of toys into activities (toy and partner at same social activity)
- Some differentiation and adjustment to nature of relationship
Ages 3-5 Pre-schoolers Developmental Trends (extra)
- Symbolic play and development of verbal skills
- Communication of meaning, sharing of knowledge
- Negotiation of rules
- Group rather than dyadic play
- Large increase in social play
Childhood- School years Developmental Trends (extra)
- New opportunities for interaction
- Continued development of previous patterns
- Proficient readers of others’ emotions, motives and intentions
- Geocentricism is left behind
- More choosy of partners
- Friendships are meaningful and sustained
- Groups- same sex based on common interest
- Peer groups- major role in lives of individual children
2a) Comment on the long term implications of sociometric status to future social problems.
Base your answers on research by Kupersmidt & Cole, 1990 (Lec. 3)
- Sociometric status to degree to which someone likes or dislikes
- Their research looked at sociometric status groups (popular, average, neglected, and rejected
kids) and compared it to the percentage of future social problems kids in these groups showed
(looking at dropout rates in groups, involvement with the police, suspension from school etc.)
- In general, rejected kids are most problematic in the long run when looking at clear and
subjective statuses (Rejected, Neglected, average and popular kids)
- Popular kids show the least amount of future problems
- Often neglected kids are very smart and show fewer problems in the future compared to
popular and average kids. They build good relationships and career. This is because neglected
kids often don’t get diverted into the “wrong” things (e.g. drinking, drugs, partying etc.),
unlike popular kids. So, they are able to focus more on making their future brighter. Whereas,
popular kids often end up ruining their future.
- SO, kids don’t always fit nicely into the sociometric status and we cannot predict outcomes of
how kids in each of these groups will turn out
2b) What conditions are associated with friendlessness?
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-2 of the document.
Unlock all 7 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

1a) describe the behavioural profile of rejected children. (lec. They have much disruptive behaviour e. g. a child who peers don"t want to play basketball with because last time he/he played, they took the ball and ran away. They are extremely active e. g. kids with adhd are very active and tend to be more disruptive. They are talkative people who talk non-stop get annoying. They try frequent attempts at social approaches they always try to join the group without understanding the situation and how to act in the situation which can get very annoying. They part-take in little cooperative play, and are unwilling to share. They often have inappropriate behaviours e. g. when a child isn"t being accepted into a group, they might end up bullying their way into the group. 1b) paul is 6 and james is 10. In what ways is it both similar and different from same-age peer relationships and adult-child relationships? (lec.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.