RLG101H5 Final: RLG101 Exam Questions

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READING 1
ABRAHAM in the Hebrew Bible is a composite figure; yet the story of the
sacrifice of his son is a theme that is central to later Jewish, Christian, and
Islamic traditions. Provide a detailed discussion of this statement.
- The rabbinic aggadah on Abraham is well represented in the Mirdash.
- Abraham was the first man to acknowledge the existence of God while in
Chaldea with the idolatries. He migrated with his father to Haran where he
received a prophetic experience/ call from God (YHWH) who told him to go back
to his father’s house and he will make of him a great nation. He was the first
monotheist prophet and was considered the “father of many” since God said to
him “I will make of you a great nation”, leading them to the promised land of
Israel.
- He had a son his Hagar (Ishmael) and a son (Isaac) with Sara after God made
a Covenant with him. The sign of the covenant was circumcision, and the
blessings of the covenant are extended to Isaac and all of his offspring. This
includes all Jews, Christians through Isaac. God says He will bless Ishmael and
make him a great nation as well. Therefore Muslims are blessed as well.
- Abraham’s call to go to an unknown place was the beginning of his trials of
faith, which climaxed at Mount Moriah where he offers his son Isaac to God.
- In Judaism, he is of great importance because he was the forefather of the
Jews, through the line of his legitimate son, Isaac. He is a symbol of absolute
faith due to his sacrifice of his son for God, until God told him to stop. This is
because God saw Abraham’s blind obedience and fear. In all traditions he was
considered the patriarch of their religions
- In Christianity Abraham is the father of faith, who believed in God even though
there was no evidence of him existing. He was the patriarch though Isaac. The
letter of the Hebrews uses Abraham as an example of faith, recounting his testing
through the sacrifice of Isaac.
- In Islam, Muslims trace their lineage to Abraham through Ishmael. To them
Abraham is the first prophet since he is the first to convert to the true God and
speak against idolatry. Also Abraham and Ishmael are seen as founders of the
Ka’bah in Mecca. Also see him as the first Muslim since he practices Islam
(submission to absolute obedience to God). His obedience was proven when he
was tested by the command to sacrifice his son.
READING 2
Provide a detailed discussion of the historicity of MOSES and how he is known in
RABBINIC JEWISH tradition.
- The rabbinic aggadah on Abraham is well represented in the Mirdash.
- Abraham was the first man to acknowledge the existence of God while in
Chaldea with the idolatries. He migrated with his father to Haran where he
received a prophetic experience/ call from God (YHWH) who told him to go back
to his father’s house and he will make of him a great nation. He was the first
monotheist prophet and was considered the “father of many” since God said to
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him “I will make of you a great nation”, leading them to the promised land of
Israel.
- He had a son his Hagar (Ishmael) and a son (Isaac) with Sara after God made
a Covenant with him. The sign of the covenant was circumcision, and the
blessings of the covenant are extended to Isaac and all of his offspring. This
includes all Jews, Christians through Isaac. God says He will bless Ishmael and
make him a great nation as well. Therefore Muslims are blessed as well.
- Abraham’s call to go to an unknown place was the beginning of his trials of
faith, which climaxed at Mount Moriah where he offers his son Isaac to God.
- In Judaism, he is of great importance because he was the forefather of the
Jews, through the line of his legitimate son, Isaac. He is a symbol of absolute
faith due to his sacrifice of his son for God, until God told him to stop. This is
because God saw Abraham’s blind obedience and fear. In all traditions he was
considered the patriarch of their religions
- In Christianity Abraham is the father of faith, who believed in God even though
there was no evidence of him existing. He was the patriarch though Isaac. The
letter of the Hebrews uses Abraham as an example of faith, recounting his testing
through the sacrifice of Isaac.
- In Islam, Muslims trace their lineage to Abraham through Ishmael. To them
Abraham is the first prophet since he is the first to convert to the true God and
speak against idolatry. Also Abraham and Ishmael are seen as founders of the
Ka’bah in Mecca. Also see him as the first Muslim since he practices Islam
(submission to absolute obedience to God). His obedience was proven when he
was tested by the command to sacrifice his son.
READING 3
Provide a detailed discussion of MOSES as “the deliverer from Egypt.”
For the deliverance of the people through Moses is the theme of the oppression
and enslavement in Egypt. Within the theme of enslavement there is written
about an attempted genocide which provides the context for the story of Moses’
birth and rescue. However, his initial attempt at deliverance whereby he kills an
Egyptian for beating a Hebrew, is antiheroic because it ends in failure and leads
only to his flight to the land of Midian where he becomes a shepherd. Moses is
totally dependent on the divine word from Yahveh for each action he takes. The
story of the burning bush has the marks of a new beginning for Moses and it
resembles a prophetic-call. He protests Yahveh’s request but his call resembles
the commissioning of a military leader whose task is to deliver his people from
oppression. Moses is basically the spokesperson for Yahveh to the Hebrew
people and the Egyptian ruler. The plague stories carry out the image of Moses
as a deliverer through the prophetic word of judgement and salvation. But they
also add the element of the prophet as a wonder-worker. The climax of the
Israel’s deliverance is at the Red Sea where Moses, at God’s command, splits
the sea with his rod to create a path for the Israelites and again at God’s
command, makes the sea come back upon their pursuers. Moses has direct
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leadership of his people and with God’s help is able to free his people from
Egypt.
READING 4
Name the FOUR GOSPELS and give the approximate dates each was written.
Give two reasons why a reliance on the Gospels makes learning about the
historical events of Jesus’ life more difficult. Give one reason why their accounts
might be taken as reliable.
The Gospels are of Mark (ca. 70 AD), Matthew and Luke (ca. 80), and John (ca.
90). The Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke, collectively the Synoptic Gospels,
can be trusted because of their stories of the Herods, the Pharisees, Pontius
Pilate, the Sadducees, and so on, which correspond well with accounts from
Josephus, Philo Judaeus, and other non-Christian sources, and because of the
supportive sums of some of their individual attestations. However, relying on the
Gospels makes historically understanding Jesus difficult, because they do not
agree on everything. For example, the Synoptic Gospels concur that Jesus’
ministry lasted only a year, and that he only traveled to Jerusalem once, whereas
John says that Jesus stayed three Passovers in Jerusalem, a significantly longer
period, which makes more sense of the authorities’ hostility toward him. In
addition, the Gospels provide different understandings of when Jesus existed.
Furthermore, at stage three of the development of the Gospels, the evangelist
writers modified their material in accordance with their own theological
interpretations and for their particular audiences.
READING 5
Highlight the key events in the MINISTRY of JESUS.
Ultimately, through his words and actions, Jesus proclaimed the rule of God. He
wanted to offer a final salvation. Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist,
preached and spoke allegories, called on sinners to atone and accept God’s
pardon, called on disciples, and worked miracles, such as walking on water,
turning water into wine, exorcisms, healing, resurrecting the dead, and feeding
thousands with only a few loaves of bread and a few fish. Jesus proclaimed
himself as the messiah (which in Greek is “Christos”).
READING 6
Explain the two elements entailed in the Hebrew term “mashiah” (or “messiah”).
What evidence do we have to suggest that JESUS thought of himself as
MESSIAH during his own lifetime?
- “Mashiah” (messiah) – God’s anointed agent of salvation and a kingly deliverer
of David’s house
- Through his words and deeds, he proclaimed the kingdom of God – understood
himself to be starting a new, powerful, and final offer of salvation
- Audience was to repent and accept Jesus and his teachings – words of
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Document Summary

Abraham in the hebrew bible is a composite figure; yet the story of the sacrifice of his son is a theme that is central to later jewish, christian, and. Provide a detailed discussion of the historicity of moses and how he is known in. The rabbinic aggadah on abraham is well represented in the mirdash. Abraham was the first man to acknowledge the existence of god while in. He migrated with his father to haran where he received a prophetic experience/ call from god (yhwh) who told him to go back to his father"s house and he will make of him a great nation. He was the first monotheist prophet and was considered the father of many since god said to him i will make of you a great nation , leading them to the promised land of. He had a son his hagar (ishmael) and a son (isaac) with sara after god made a covenant with him.

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