Study Guides (248,280)
Canada (121,450)
Religion (249)
RLG205H5 (18)
Ajay Rao (8)
Final

RLG205FinalExamAnswerKey

7 Pages
365 Views
Likes
Unlock Document

Department
Religion
Course
RLG205H5
Professor
Ajay Rao
Semester
Fall

Description
RLG205 INTRODUCTION TO SOUTH ASIAN RELIGIONS FINAL EXAM STUDY QUESTIONS 1. What role did colonialism and Orientalist scholarship play in shaping the modern understanding of Hinduism as a unified religion? Prior to the advent of the British, how did Islamic conceptions of India contribute to transformations of Hindu identity? Orientalism is the concept of how westerners viewed the eastern part of the world. Essentially orientalism is a misunderstanding of the east by the west. Colonialism is acquiring the control of another country, occupying it with settlers. The British colonized India. These two factors played a huge role in unifying Hinduism as a religion. Colonialists from British helped make the identity of the Hindu’s as a religion. When the British came to colonize India they encountered the Muslims and the non­Muslims. This where the term Hindu arrived from as it was means of dividing the two ethnic groups for the British. The roles colonialism and Orientalists scholarship played in shaping the modern understanding of Hinduism was they put laws which forced people to choose if they are Hindu or not so basically it forced Hinduism to define itself. It stopped the tradition of widows throwing themselves into fire after their husbands died, it weakened the caste system to some degree and translated Hindu texts that were only in Sanskrit, into local languages giving access to Hindus who didn’t know Sanskrit. Warren Hastings back in 1772 enforced a judicial plan, which divided the Muslims and Hindus. The British coming over had to make a distinction between the different groups in India. Cast Disabilities Act in 1850 enforced personal law, which meant different laws for different religions. Thus the Hindus who were Vaishnavas and Saivanas who read similar texts like the Vedas were lumped together despite the fact they had different beliefs. That is how orientalism and colonialism shaped India and the unification of Hinduism. Before this outlined in the David Lorenz article he talks about how Muslims are the main reason for Hinduism being a unified religion. Both of these Muslims and non­Muslim groups had conflicts. David Lorenz talks about Muslims and Hindus ridiculed the other’s religion. For example Muslims said how their God Krishna was imprisoned. Also they said how thieves stole God’s wife (Sita from Rama) and how he needed the help of the monkeys. The Hindu’s also attacked Muslims saying how could one creature kill another creature and go to heaven. They also said how can God only be at Mecca? He is everywhere. They also said you want to convert Hindus into Muslims does that mean God made a mistake in making Hindus? Clearly from these arguments it is clear Hinduism existed and fought back against the Muslims. Showing evidence that the Muslims encounter enforced the unification of Hinduism as a religion. When looking at Muslim sources Abd Al Malik Isami in his work clearly outlines that Hindi means geographical sense and Hindu is related to religion. His text was written in 1350 showing that Hinduism was constructed long before the British got there in the 19th century. 2. What are the two theories of karma? What does the relationship between these two theories tell us about the nature of ritual analysis and philosophy in the Upanisads? One theory of karma includes the practice of sacrifice. The theory of karma in relation to sacrifice was about how one would sacrifice an animal for something in return by the Gods. Although this reward for sacrifice was not received instantly. Most of the time it took time, like entry into heaven. It was not instantaneous, but the results would eventually come. The other theory of Karma that is a more common belief is the cosmic principle­governing rebirth. The cosmic principle is about your good and bad actions. Karma is metaphorically like a bank account, where your good actions helps your account grow, while bad actions take away from it and can result in you being in debt. When you perform something good, you might not receive the results instantly, but you might later on in life. Same with performing a bad action, you might get a payoff in a sense for the bad action you did. Everything has a way of coming back to you. Ultimately the way you act is the way God treats you. If you do well you will go to heaven. It might not affect in your current life and can affect you in your next life. Both of these theories are related to reincarnation. If you behave poorly and perform bad actions you will most likely reincarnate to an unwanted species. Good actions will allow you to reincarnate into something positive. In both situations you might get the results in later lives. The Upanishads encompasses the last part of the Vedas, which is a Vedic text. The Upanishads is very philosophical and often incorporates themes like rebirth, liberation and asceticism. The theme of rebirth often comes back to karma. Reincarnation, which is rebirth, has ultimate dependence on your karma. If you have good karma, most likely you will be re­born into something positive instead of negative. In the Upanishads karma is expressed as a principle of cause and effect. The Upanishads outline the importance of Karma for Hindus. The purpose of life in Hinduism is thus to minimize bad karma in order to enjoy better fortune in this life and achieve a better rebirth in the next. What the analysis of these two theories tells about the philosophy of the Upanishads is that it shows Hindus how to reach ultimate liberation or as they would call it Moksha. The theories tell us that the Upanishads were philosophical and helped Hindus toward the right path in showing them the goals in life. The Upanishads encouraged good karma, as bad karma would be put you in a never­ending cycle. Good karma would allow you to separate from this cycle and be liberated. Which is one of the four main goals in life for Hindus. In the Upanisads the philosophy of karma as a sacrifice/ritual evolved to more abstract functions with the ultimate questions. At first the rituals were to appease the Gods to give you what you want: a son, heaven or rain etc. it may even seem short­termed and materialistic. There is an offering to the Gods – hymns etc. they would sacrifice a goat or a cow in a very specific alter. There is a reciprocal relationship between their sacrifice and the God. They would memorize the vedas and recite the appropriate hymns to appease to a certain God. The two types of karma are the same process because they both have that unseen aspect and both offer rewards eventually. The Upanisads made it all more ethical because it redesigned karma as not just an instant procedure but instilled it in everything one does. The texts talk more about the absolute, ultimate questions like the metaphysical relationship between the universal spirit and me. It appointed karma as the law of nature, which would decide a person’s rebirth. Ritual analysis: rituals brought good karma, if done properly at the appropriate alter. Philosophical: Karma became more than a reward of a sacrifice, it became a daily practice that brings you closer to God. 3. How does the relationship between the householder ideal and the renouncer ideal (as developed in traditions such as Buddhism and Jainism) represent a basic tension in South Asian religions? In what ways does the ashrama (life­stages) system and classification of four goals of life  domesticate renunciation within Vedic society? The relationship between the householder ideal and the renouncer ideal is complicated. The relationship represents a basic tension in South Asian religions. In Buddhism and Jainism, renunciation is the ultimate goal in life when it comes to being liberated. Renunciation is key if wanting ultimate liberation. A renouncer is someone who gives up all attachments and has nothing to their name. They live on the streets and beg. In contrast in Vedic society the householder like the name indicates has possessions. The householder often has a house, a family, a fire and participates in sacrifice. These conflicts with the renouncer as renouncers don’t participate in sacrifice, have no house, must remain celibate and just meditate. In Vedic society marriage is encouraged and in Buddhism and Jainism celibacy is. Ultimately Buddhism and Jainism reject Vedic ideals. The concept of having a home and having attachments is the total opposite of what a renouncer is. The ashrama system accepts renunciation in Vedic society. The four stages of life include the student, the householder, forest dwellers, and the renouncer. In Vedic society the renouncer is the final stage of life. The student’s main goal is memorize the Vedas. Next the householder is married and owns a house. Next the forest dweller stage involves meditation in the forest and a watered down version of a renouncer. The forest dweller still owns a house and still lives with his wife. The final stage is the renouncer where it is like retirement. You live separate of your family and perform no rituals. This accommodates renunciation as you live with non attachment. The difference is it is not the goal in life like in Buddhism and Jainism. When looking at the four goals in life: wealth, sexual desire, moral duty and liberation, this is direct conflict of what renunciation is depicted as in Buddhism and Jainism. Renouncers do not have anything to their name so wealth is irrelevant. Renouncers are celibate to sexual desire is also irrelevant. Moral duty of a Buddhist is renunciation. Finally liberation. These four aspects encompass the goal in life, which contradict the renouncer lifestyle. Although Vedic society does incorporate renunciation, it is the not the goal in life like in Buddhism and Jainism. 4. Summarize the central narrative of the Ramayana. Sage Valmiki’s Ramayana is one of the two most important religious epics of Hinduism, the other being Mahabharata. In addition to illustrating ideal roles and relationships of characters in the story, Ramayana essentially stresses on the significance of dharma, or duty and virtuous conduct, in an individual’s life. The Ramayana is a story about Rama who is the son of the king of Ayodhya, and who is claimed to be a reincarnation of Lord Vishnu. Rama is not an ordinary human as he is a divine being. Rama is the heir to the throne. Rama’s father Dasarantha at first could not have a son, so his wives eat porridge and engage in coitus with the Gods. Then Rama is born. Rama and his half­brother Lakshama become heroes while only in their teenage by fighting off various demons.  In his adulthood, Rama marries Sita by winning a competition that required demonstration of immense power, thus displaying qualities of an ideal husband who is well­capable of protecting his wife. Later he portrays himself as the ideal son by renouncing the throne of Ayodhya for the sake of his father’s dignity, ignoring the injustice set forth by his step­mother. Here, Rama’s father too represents an ideal king by not going back on his word to his wife, even though he had to be unfair towards his eldest son. Sita is presented as the ideal wife by her way of renouncing all luxuries of the palace and following her husband Rama into exile for fourteen years, while Laxmana shows himself as the ideal brother by choosing to renounce with his brother. Hence, the illustration of humbleness and respect is a key characteristic of the Ramayana. Moreover, it emphasises on the fundamental principle of dharma – working for the benefit of humanity in order to sustain a peaceful and harmonious world; by depicting the choice of renunciation made my Rama, Sita & Laxmana. While in the forest, Sita is abducted by a powerful and dangerous demon Ravana, but is later rescued by her husband and brother­in­law with the help of a clever monkey Hanuman. Rama at this point clearly displays mortal human emotions such as doubt, when he puts his wife through a fire­test in order to prove her purity after rescuing her from the demon Ravana. Thus, in the Ramayana, Valmiki does not portray Rama as a supernatural being, rather as a human who encounters various shortcomings and moral dilemmas, and overcomes them by adhering to the righteous ways of dharma, inspite of struggling with moral flaws and prejudices. Ramayana therefore illustrates and emphasises on respect for others, selflessness, and virtuousness. 5. What are the principal arguments used by Krishna in the second chapter of the Bhagavad Gita to convince Arjuna of the propriety of fighting against the Kauravas? How are these arguments both contextually situated within the Mahabharata and yet of broader philosophical significance? King Shantanu falls in love with a fisher girl and has two sons. Shantanu promises to his father in law that his grandchildren will be kings. Bhisma hears this and leaves renouncing everything. Shantanu has two sons Pandu and Dhritarashtra. Pandu is white and Dhritarashtra is blind. Dhritarashtra has 100 Kavravas and Pandu has 5 Pandavas. Pandu is cursed and then killed because he has sex. Dhritarashtra is blind and cannot be king, so the kingship is divided in half between the cousins. Pandavas are successful with the throne, but the Kavravas try to kill them, as they are jealous. Then in a game of dice Yuddhistra loses his kingdom and his family. The 5 brothers are sent to the forest to live for 13 years. Then the Pandavas engage in war with Kavaravas. Before they start Arjuna sees all his cousins and sees Bhisma and is overwhelmed. He renounces the world and does not want to fight anymore. Krishna, a God on Earth sides with the Pandavas. Krishna then tries to convince Arjuna to fight. Krishna makes three arguments: First he says the war will not destroy Arjuna’s family, they will continue to live because their souls are eternal and to not associate body with soul. Souls are eternal as the body dies the soul does and they are reborn, so not to worry about killing them. Secondly he argues that it is Arjuna’s duty, to fight, as he is a warrior not a renouncer. Krishna explains that one should always act with the intention of keeping the order of the world, if one is acting to simply maintain social order they are acting correctly, regardless if it goes against the ideas of renunciation. Lastly he says that Arjuna must not to dwell on the consequences of fighting the war, but instead to concentrate on the action. He claims it is his duty to fight. These arguments are situated with the Mahabharata as the Mahabharata stresses action with nonattachment just how Krishna is stressing to Arjuna to act. The Mahabharata represents the four goals of life, and an important goal in life for Arjuna is moral duty. Krishna tries to convince Arjuna that is his moral duty to fight. A renouncer in Vedic society is for someone who is old and retired, and he is not at that stage yet. Krishna tells him that he is a warrior and not a renouncer. He tells him that it is his duty to fight. One of the goals of the four includes dharma, which is moral duty. These arguments stress the same themes that the Mahabharata is. Krishna’s arguments emphasize the importance of the Mahabharata and its teachings, which include the four life goals. 6. How do Hindu traditions reconcile the apparent contradiction between a multiplicity of gods (e.g., 350 million) and the omnipotence and transcendence of Vishnu or Siva as paramount deities? Hindus worship 330 million gods meaning they are pol
More Less

Related notes for RLG205H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit