SOC205H5 Study Guide - Final Guide: Governmentality, Postcolonialism, Moral Agency

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Published on 15 Apr 2013
School
UTM
Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H5
April 3, 2013
Final Lecture
General Themes in Course
Started with questions (what is guiding us through this course)
o Different questions, from different perspectives, asking different questions
o Why do we focus on certain crimes or ignore aboriginals
o Different starting points in criminology
o i.e. waiter serving plate of food multiple perspectives of looking at one thing
o theories may not sit together well because they have different starting points
Criminology is not limited to solving crime; could do more than what traditionally criminology
was thought to do (expanding limits)
o What can/should criminology do?
o Small box of crime and punishment (Kant) in criminology (uniform understanding of
criminology)
o Crime defined as act against the state/law; other types of acts that can be defined as
criminal? Regulation?
State somehow becomes necessary in defining what crime and law is
I.e. Disneyland (**review last year’s exam)
What do we say when someone asks what criminology is?
o Limited understanding
o Assumed to be C.S.I. type of activity
o Our understanding of criminology changed over time as we learn more criminology
Feminism
Traditional feminist narrative in criminology, presented by Komack
o What criminology is about (masculine enterprise)
o Concerned with and explaining male criminology
o Exclusionary discipline (“add women and stir” approach)
By trying to bring women into the discussion, to include them, you are still
creating different barriers
Tools in feminism/criminology that open up new possibilities
Similarities between post-colonialist and feminist ideas
Reflexivity
i.e. aspects of Professor Levinsky teaching a class
o questioning the authority/ expert
being critical of textbook knowledge
being informed/recognition of the problem is reflexive which informs practices
of prof
o but at the same time, there is already a division being created
scholars
o (first wave of scholars)infantilized aboriginals- they were the ‘other’; savages that
needed civilization
o (second wave of scholars) correcting this tried to tell stories about aboriginals; realizing
they are not savages but they just have different ways of doing things
Putting them as central; telling sympathetic stories
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Document Summary

State somehow becomes necessary in defining what crime and law is. What do we say when someone asks what criminology is: limited understanding, assumed to be c. s. i. type of activity, our understanding of criminology changed over time as we learn more criminology. Traditional feminist narrative in criminology, presented by komack: what criminology is about (masculine enterprise, concerned with and explaining male criminology, exclusionary discipline ( add women and stir approach) By trying to bring women into the discussion, to include them, you are still creating different barriers. Tools in feminism/criminology that open up new possibilities. Reflexivity i. e. aspects of professor levinsky teaching a class: questioning the authority/ expert. Putting them as central; telling sympathetic stories. Kant- against public criminology; limiting criminology to crime and punishment: low pragmatic uses. All of them suggesting that neo-liberalism isn"t fully realized. Morality still embedded in structures that are seemingly amoral.

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