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[ANTA02H3] - Final Exam Guide - Ultimate 32 pages long Study Guide!


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTA02H3
Professor
Maggie Cummings
Study Guide
Final

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UTSC
ANTA02H3
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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ANTA02 Winter 2015
Lecture 2
What is culture and how do anthropologists investigate it?
Readings: Cultural antrho chapter 1, feeding desire ch 1 and 2
- Sociocultural anthropology
- What is culture? How do anthropologists study it?
- Goal for the course to teach you to think like an anthropologists
- First thing you need to know to think like an anthropologist what is anthropology/sociocultural anthropology?
What make anthropology different/better than other disciplines in social sciences?
Think about 2 things
Method of studying culture fieldwork
Object of sociocultural anthropology
If you want to understand what anthropology is, you need to look at what anthropologists do ethnography
- Ethnography writing culture
- Fieldwork
What sets anthropology apart from other displaces
Sociologists rely on survey
Historians study archives
Biologists do stuff in lab
Athropologists, ulike others, the leae the lirar/lass/offie ad lie ith the people the’re trying to
understand
Rite of passage you have to do fieldwork to be an anthropologist
Rite of passage for anthropologist doing fieldwork
Sets anthropology apart
What e do
- Ethnography
Writing
Based on extended periods of fieldwork
Can be broken up in smaller chunks articles, summaries, chapters
Based o soeoe’s fieldork
Example Balinese cockfight
What e rite
Desriptio is’t the ol thig iportat i ethograph
Also analysis for that description how to make sense of why it is important
Deeper understanding of how and why people do what they do
Job of a good ethnography portray a given culture from the atie’s poit of ie
Ho do e eplai a ulture that is ufailiar to us fro a atie’s poit of ie?
Natie’s poit of ie eic (insider perspective)
With that perspective, we use it to analyze it from an outsider perspective
Etic outsider perspective
- Clifford Geertz Balinese cockfight
Argued to get to the atie’s poit of ie
You not only an description, you need a thick description
Context, layers of significance, describing those for your readers
To trul oe the atie’s poit of ie
Explains the context
He wrote a story about winking it ould ea that our flirtig, if ould ea that ou’re pretedig to flirt
We must understand the context in order to understand the winking
Outside perspective flirting thin description
Inside perspective understanding the context thick description
The wink can have all types of meanings, you need to understand the context to understand it
This was Geertz example
- Another example raising eyebrows
Without understanding the context, you might think that they are flirting with you
However, in this context, it conveyed agreement
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ANTA02 Winter 2015
- Ethnography and field notes must not just write the surface description, must write the deeper context
- As an anthropologist you need to do justice for the culture you are studying
- Thick description gives us context
- Natie’s poit of ie achieved through thick description (deep, rich)
- Thik desriptio Geertz’s ter
- Why did we end up doing fieldwork?
- Brief history of anthropology to understand why fieldwork is so important
Anthropology fairly young discipline in comparison to philosophy, literary studies
Given present shape in 20th century
Earliest roots history, geography, philosophy
- Herodotus philosopher that rote aout Greee’s araria eighours
This is sort of a form of proto-anthropology
- Another example of proto-anthropology travel writings of Marco Polo
- Proto-anthropology earliest writings of anthropology
- Athropolog’s reet roots Victorian era (1800s)
Coincided with reign of Queen Victoria
Victorian anthropologists (Edward Tyler, James Fraser) influenced by works of Charles Darwin
Darwin new and ground-breaking
Edward Tyler created first definition of anthropology
Culture is that ople hole hih iludes koledge, elite, orals, custom, and any capability by
a as eer of soiet… full quote in textbook on p. 9
We o loger rel o Tler’s defiitio eause he as oparig all iilizatio to Vitoria Eglad
Still, he understood that anthropology is a holistic study, falls under umbrella of culture
According to Tyler and his contemporaries soe ultures had ore ulture tha others
Based on hierarchy
Some were more civilized than others
The apex of civilization Victorian England
James Fraser interested in religion, belief systems
Wrote famous book Golden Bow
He gathered what different people and places believe
He spotted them in categories that were ranked (hierarchy)
All cultures evolved from magical thinking, to religious thinking, to scientific thinking
Some cultures were more sophisticated than others
How did people like Fraser acquire this vast knowledge for comparison
Was’t through firsthad koledge, as’t through fieldork
These were comparative, second-hand accounts armchair anthropology
- Tyler and Fraser were both armchair anthropologists
Reading accounts from missionaries, explorers
Sat in their offices, and wrote their comparative books based on second-hand research
- End of 19th century anthropologists began to venture out of their offices
However, short-term stays, go in teams, stay with missionaries and colonial officers
Stay with the white people
Did’t get their had dirt
This is what would be considered anthropology on the veranda
- Malioski O the Verada
They did go to the places they wanted to study
Hoeer, the ol staed ith the hites
The athed life go 
But the did’t reall talk to a of the people the ere studig
- Malioski Off the Verada
One of the first anthropologists that came off the off the veranda
Talking to Torobian Islanders (currently Papua New Guinea)
This movement off the veranda how fieldwork got started
- Founding fathers of fieldwork
Malinowski and Boas
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