CITB01H3 Study Guide - Final Guide: Chimney Swift, Migratory Birds Convention Act, Floor Area Ratio

187 views26 pages
Published on 21 Apr 2013
School
Department
Course
January 9th, 2013
Lecture 1: What is Planning?
Planning is the deliberate social or organizational activity of developing an optimal strategy for future action to achieve a
desired set of goals, for solving novel problems in complex contexts, and attended by the power and intention to
commit resources and to act as necessary to implement the chosen strategy. (Ernest Alexander)
- Always about present and future
What is Urban Planning?
In broadest terms, urban and regional planning is the process by which communities attempt to control and/or design
change and development in their physical environments. (Canadian Encyclopedia)
Planning is concerned with the interrelationship among...
- People, physical objects, and ecological processes
- Problems, subject matter, and specializations
- Jurisdictions (federal, provincial and municipal)
- Domains (social, economic, political, physical)
Three Key Questions in Planning
1. What action is necessary?
2. Who should act?
3. How should we proceed?
Do we all agree on what the desired outcome is and how to achieve it?
Three Planning Approaches
1. Developer’s Approach
2. Community Interest Approach
3. Municipal Planner’s Approach
Summary
- Defining (urban) planning
- Different planning approaches
- The politics of choice
- The historical specificity of planning ideas
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 26 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
January 16th, 2013
Lecture 2 Canadian Urban Development: Past and Present
Two aspects of urban development
1 Urban System all cities within one urban system
2 Intra-Urban Structure structure of environment within cities
Mercantile Period (1600-1800)
- Canada as part of a colonial trading system
o Resource extraction in Canada (trading)
Fur (interest to British, France, Europeans)
- Population and settlements remained small - small scale
- Staples Theory (Harold Innis) explain Canadian development by looking at staples
o Fur is relatively small, so not many people are needed, thus not much settlement
- Emergence of small-scale subsistence farming
- Quebec City and Montreal were the largest cities in Canada
- Developed, colonized with natural resources
Agricultural Expansion (1800-1850)
- Lumber had become the dominant export
o Decline in fur exports
- Significant population growth
- Forestry industry cleared land for agricultural development
o Cut down trees → clearing of land → land to build homes
- Larger ships were needed to carry lumber exports → increase of immigrants
- The economic base of towns diversed
- Westward expansion
- Toronto grew significantly golden horseshoe
o Became commercial centre
- Early industrial development
- Transportation: walking (mostly) and horse carriages
- The urban form remained compact
o Because mode of transportation was walking
- Early industrial development
o Halifax ship building
- Starvation in Ireland
o Potatoes
- Enclosure Movement Scotland
- 1851 population of 2.5 million
o USA population was 10x larger, and keeps at a constant 10x
Canada’s Industrialization (1850-1845)
- Westward (agricultural) expansion
- Cities grew, but still compact (walking was still mostly used, and carriages were still a luxury)
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 26 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
- Later industrialization than other places like the UK, Europe, and USA
o In some ways, an advantage
- Wanted to bring provinces together
- American expansion → pushing Canada’s western connection
- Confederation (1867)
- First National Policy (1879)
- Industrial development of the “heartland”
- Emergence of a “heartland-hinterland” split
- Diversification of Canada’s urban form
- Transcontinental Railway
o Merging East and West
o Trading linkage
- Lots of regional pulls
- Natural Resources, agricultural products - West to East
- Continental Europe for recruitment
o German, Polish, Ukrainian, Swiss, etc.
o European Immigration only
- Import tariffs
- Import Substitution Industrialization
- Mass public transportation
The Fordist Keynesian Era (1945 - 1975)
- Mass production/mass consumption
- The government encouraged homeownership and the consumption of consumer goods
- Beginning of large-scale suburbanization
- Car-oriented urban development
- Middle-class suburbanization contributed to a “filtering down” of the inner city housing stock
- Henry Ford
o Made cars more productive
o Assembly line
- People could purchase the goods they (themselves) produced
- Keynesian stimulate aggregate demand in economy
o People spending money
o Promote full employment
- Invest in infrastructure jobs
- 1930s allowed people to build
- Mass consumer goods automobiles
- Transition late 40s +50s → large scale suburbanization
- Emergence of regional shopping malls
Current Developments
- Canada has become an “urban nation”
- Urbanization continues, albeit with a different geography
- Metropolitan concentration/dominance: urban growth is concentrated in five regions
- Pronounced contrast between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas of the country
- Canada urbanization over 85% (one of the largest)
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 26 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

In broadest terms, urban and regional planning is the process by which communities attempt to control and/or design change and development in their physical environments. (canadian encyclopedia) Three planning approaches: developer"s approach, community interest approach, municipal planner"s approach. Lecture 2 canadian urban development: past and present. 1 urban system all cities within one urban system. Intra-urban structure structure of environment within cities. Canada as part of a colonial trading system: resource extraction in canada (trading) Population and settlements remained small - small scale. Staples theory (harold innis) explain canadian development by looking at staples: fur is relatively small, so not many people are needed, thus not much settlement. Quebec city and montreal were the largest cities in canada. Forestry industry cleared land for agricultural development: cut down trees clearing of land land to build homes. Larger ships were needed to carry lumber exports increase of immigrants. Toronto grew significantly golden horseshoe: became commercial centre.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.