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[EESA09H3] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (25 pages long!)


Department
Environmental Science
Course Code
EESA09H3
Professor
Tanzina Mohsin
Study Guide
Final

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UTSC
EESA09H3
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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EESA09H
Lecture 1 Notes
1. Contact Information:
Instructor: Tanzina Mohsin
Room: EV364
Tel.: 416-287-7245
Email: tanzina.mohsin@utoronto.ca
2. Marking Scheme
Midterm: 30%
Participation: 20% (quizzes+participations)
Final: 50%
Format for Midterm, Final: Multiple Choice, T/F, Fill in the Blank, Matching,
Definitions, Short answer questions, concept maps and others
3. List of Lectures (tentative)
1. Introduction to Wind
2. Global Wind Circulation
3. Midlatitude Cyclones
4. Thunderstorms/Tornadoes
5. Hurricanes
6. Polar lows
Midterm (October 22)
7. Thermal winds
8. Measuring Winds
9. Winds and Pollution
10. Wind Power
11. Climate Change: The role of Wind
12. Review
Each week the PowerPoint presentation of the lecture will be posted on the course
Web page. In addition a set of notes is being developed (this document, for example)
which will expand on the lecture and provided additional references.
READ THE COURSE OUTLINE FOR DETAIL INFO ON THE COURSE
ELEMENTS.
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4. General Types and Characteristics of WIND in the Universe
Wind basically runs the whole Universe. Depending on the composition (gaseous),
scale and types of forces associated with WIND, it can be classified in different ways
For large scale circulation around the universe we can categorize wind as Solar wind
Planetary wind. Solar wind primarily consists of charged particles such as protons
and electrons. It moves outward from sun to space at a speed one cannot imagine on
Earth. Solar wind moves at speeds as high as 900 km/s and at a temperature of 1
million degrees (Celsius).Luckily solar wind has not much effect on Earth. Planetary
wind is any wind system that exists on Earth due to solar radiation or due to various
forces. It is associated with most of the meteorological variables that affect our
weather and climate. The focus of our course is on planetary win
5. Mythological and Cultural Winds
Wind has played a key role in humanity’s mythology and cultural development.
Mythological figures such as Aeolus (Greek god of Wind), Feng Po Po (Chinese
goddess of wind), Haya-ji (Japanese god of wind, whirlwind), Nilch’i (Navajo holy
wind) have played key roles in the world views in their respective cultures. In early
Japanese culture, their civilization followed the Shinto, spiritual principles to
maintain their connection between their ancestors and the living. Fujin was one of the
earliest gods of Shinto, the god of wind. Wind is seen as a pure substance and
considered a universal power, literally providing a spiritual connection between them.
In the Hindu and Buddhist religions, wind is viewed as the nature or state of a god,
referred to as “vayu”, “pavan” and “godai”. Wind is one of the five great elements
respected, studied and celebrated by spiritualists from other religions such as Islam,
Judaism, and Christianity in their quest for wisdom.
Winds also play a metaphoric role in literature including movies. In stories such as
Gone with the Wind (1939), Chocolat (2000), and The Wind that Shakes the Barley
(2007) winds are a metaphor for change in a society or community. Storm imagery in
The Hurricane (1999), Monsoon Wedding (2001), and Twister (1996) are reflected in
the interpersonal dynamics within the movie.
Of course sometimes a wind is a wind and is not metaphoric. There are a number of
books that describe the physics of wind and its impacts. Wind by Jan DeBlieu and
Windswept by Marq de Villiers are beautifully written books covering many physical
and social elements of wind.
6. Outline of this lecture
Atmospheric Primer:
The history of wind
- 4.6 billion years of air
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