ENGA10H3 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Ginger Beer, Victorian Morality, Madness

217 views52 pages
Published on 3 Oct 2017
School
UTSC
Department
English
Course
ENGA10H3
Professor
ENGA10 Midterm- Books: The Picture of Dorian Gray, Heart of
Darkness, & Dubliners (from SPARKNOTES)
The Picture of Dorian Gray
full title · The Picture of Dorian Gray
author · Oscar Wilde
type of work · Novel
genre · Gothic; philosophical; comedy of manners
language · English
time and place written · 1890, London
date of first publication · The first edition of the novel was published in
1890 in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. A second edition, complete with six
additional chapters, was published the following year.
publisher · The 1891 edition was published by Ward, Lock & Company.
narrator · The narrator is anonymous.
point of view · The point of view is third person, omniscient. The narrator
chronicles both the objective or external world and the subjective or internal
thoughts and feelings of the characters. There is one short paragraph where a
first-person point of view becomes apparent; in this section, Wilde becomes
the narrator.
tone · Gothic (dark, supernatural); sardonic; comedic
tense · Past
setting (time) · 1890s
setting (place) · London, England
protagonist · Dorian Gray
major conflict · Dorian Gray, having promised his soul in order to live a life
of perpetual youth, must try to reconcile himself to the bodily decay and
dissipation that are recorded in his portrait.
rising action · Dorian notices the change in his portrait after ending his affair
with Sibyl Vane; he commits himself wholly to the yellow book” and indulges
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 52 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
his fancy without regard for his reputation; the discrepancy between his outer
purity and his inner depravity surges.
climax · Dorian kills Basil Hallward.
falling action · Dorian descends into London’s opium dens; he attempts to
express remorse to Lord Henry; he stabs his portrait, thereby killing himself.
themes · The purpose of art; the supremacy of youth and beauty; the surface
nature of society; the negative consequences of influence
motifs · The color white; the picture of Dorian Gray; homoerotic male
relationships
symbols · The opium den; James Vane; the yellow book
foreshadowing · The illegitimacy of Sibyl and James, as well as Sibyl’s
portrayal of Juliet from Shakespeare’s tragedy Romeo and Juliet, foreshadow
the doomed nature of Sibyl’s relationship with Dorian Gray.
Plot Overview
In the stately London home of his aunt, Lady Brandon, the well-known
artist Basil Hallward meets Dorian Gray. Dorian is a cultured, wealthy, and
impossibly beautiful young man who immediately captures Basil’s artistic
imagination. Dorian sits for several portraits, and Basil often depicts him as an
ancient Greek hero or a mythological figure. When the novel opens, the artist
is completing his first portrait of Dorian as he truly is, but, as he admits to his
friend Lord Henry Wotton, the painting disappoints him because it reveals too
much of his feeling for his subject. Lord Henry, a famous wit who enjoys
scandalizing his friends by celebrating youth, beauty, and the selfish pursuit of
pleasure, disagrees, claiming that the portrait is Basil’s masterpiece. Dorian
arrives at the studio, and Basil reluctantly introduces him to Lord Henry, who
he fears will have a damaging influence on the impressionable, young Dorian.
Basil’s fears are well founded; before the end of their first conversation, Lord
Henry upsets Dorian with a speech about the transient nature of beauty and
youth. Worried that these, his most impressive characteristics, are fading day
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 52 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
by day, Dorian curses his portrait, which he believes will one day remind him
of the beauty he will have lost. In a fit of distress, he pledges his soul if only
the painting could bear the burden of age and infamy, allowing him to stay
forever young. After Dorian’s outbursts, Lord Henry reaffirms his desire to own
the portrait; however, Basil insists the portrait belongs to Dorian.
Over the next few weeks, Lord Henry’s influence over Dorian grows stronger.
The youth becomes a disciple of the “new Hedonism” and proposes to live a
life dedicated to the pursuit of pleasure. He falls in love with Sibyl Vane, a
young actress who performs in a theater in London’s slums. He adores her
acting; she, in turn, refers to him as “Prince Charming” and refuses to heed
the warnings of her brother, James Vane, that Dorian is no good for her.
Overcome by her emotions for Dorian, Sibyl decides that she can no longer
act, wondering how she can pretend to love on the stage now that she has
experienced the real thing. Dorian, who loves Sibyl because of her ability to
act, cruelly breaks his engagement with her. After doing so, he returns home
to notice that his face in Basil’s portrait of him has changed: it now sneers.
Frightened that his wish for his likeness in the painting to bear the ill effects of
his behavior has come true and that his sins will be recorded on the canvas,
he resolves to make amends with Sibyl the next day. The following afternoon,
however, Lord Henry brings news that Sibyl has killed herself. At Lord Henry’s
urging, Dorian decides to consider her death a sort of artistic triumphshe
personified tragedyand to put the matter behind him. Meanwhile, Dorian
hides his portrait in a remote upper room of his house, where no one other
than he can watch its transformation.
Lord Henry gives Dorian a book that describes the wicked exploits of a
nineteenth-century Frenchman; it becomes Dorian’s bible as he sinks ever
deeper into a life of sin and corruption. He lives a life devoted to garnering
new experiences and sensations with no regard for conventional standards of
morality or the consequences of his actions. Eighteen years pass. Dorian’s
reputation suffers in circles of polite London society, where rumors spread
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 52 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Enga10 midterm- books: the picture of dorian gray, heart of. The narrator chronicles both the objective or external world and the subjective or internal thoughts and feelings of the characters. In the stately london home of his aunt, lady brandon, the well-known artist basil hallward meets dorian gray. Dorian is a cultured, wealthy, and impossibly beautiful young man who immediately captures basil"s artistic imagination. Dorian sits for several portraits, and basil often depicts him as an ancient greek hero or a mythological figure. Lord henry, a famous wit who enjoys scandalizing his friends by celebrating youth, beauty, and the selfish pursuit of pleasure, disagrees, claiming that the portrait is basil"s masterpiece. Dorian arrives at the studio, and basil reluctantly introduces him to lord henry, who he fears will have a damaging influence on the impressionable, young dorian. Basil"s fears are well founded; before the end of their first conversation, lord.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.