CH 10

3 Pages
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Department
International Development Studies
Course Code
IDSB04H3
Professor
Anne- Emanuelle Birn

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Climate Change: The how
"Greenhouse effect" makes earth habitable (atmosphere is warmed by naturally occurring gases
trapping heat of sun)
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Huge rise in concentration of main g-house since 1750: Co2, CH4, H2O
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Electricity generation
|
Factory production
|
Motor vehicle use
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Agriculture and land use changes
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Principal Sources:
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Market forces-- shaping production and consumption patterns-- are far more important than population
in explaining patterns of fossil fuel consumption
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Climate change: potential health consequences -p. 477-8
Heat waves
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Droughts: food shortage and loss of arable and habitable land
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Heat:
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Arid areas becoming direr, humid wetter
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Water and air borne pathogens
Mosquito breeding sites; new diseases
Potential displacement of human population (2/3 within 60km of sea line
Damage to fisheries and aquifers
Loss of livelihood, malnutrition, increased susceptibility to disease
Ocean levels rose by 10-20 cum in 20th century
|
Precipitation changes:
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Box 10-2: climate change and human development
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The UNDP identifies five main mechanisms through which climate change may stall and or reverse
human development
Reduced agriculture 1.
P.479
Consequences of and responses to climate change go "
beyond the lifetime of politicians and business
leaders." more importantly, lowering
"greenhouse gas emissions will require significant...
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Ecological Footprints p. 480
Canadian ree and Wackernagel
P.480
2003 Global ecological foot print 2.3 hectares
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Human consumption outstripped earth's biological productivity by 20% in 2001
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But consumption is only part of the story...
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Box 10-3 Four Environment Worldviews
Market Liberal1. Approach to environmentalist
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Institutionalist2. There is a need for strong Global institution to set Voluntary standards
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Bio-environmentalist3. Scientific activist , to enhance earth's capacity
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There should be limits to economic growth
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Lower consumption
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People and mass of consumers are the problem
Lecture 10
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CH 10
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Health and the Environment
November-16-10
1:38 PM
Lecture Page 1
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Description
Lecture10- C H10- HealthandtheEnvironment November-16-10 1:38PM ClimateChange: Thehow - Greenhouseeffect makesearth habitable(atmosphereiswarmed bynaturallyoccurringgases trappingheat of sun) - Hugeriseinconcentration of main g-housesince1750: Co2,CH4,H2O - Principal Sources: Electricitygeneration Factoryproduction Motor vehicleuse Agricultureandlandusechanges - Market forces-- shapingproduction andconsumption patterns-- arefar moreimportant than population inexplainingpatternsof fossil fuel consumption Climatechange: potential healthconsequences- p. 477-8 - Heat: Heat waves Droughts: food shortageandlossof arableandhabitableland - Precipitation changes: Aridareasbecomingdirer, humidwetter Ocean levelsroseby10-20cum in 20th century Water and air bornepathogens Mosquito breedingsites; new diseases Potential displacement of humanpopulation (23 within 60km of sealine Damageto fisheriesandaquifers Loss of liveli
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