50 views3 pages
20 Dec 2010
School
Department
Course
Lecture #2- Sept 22
Phonetics- having the property of sound
-scientific study of speech sounds
-major areas of phonetics:
-articulatory phonetics: production of speech sounds
Acoustic phonetics: physical properties of speech sounds (not covered in this course)
Auditory phonetics: how sounds are heard and perceived (not covered in this course)
Speech and Segments
Native speakers of English can:
-identify the beginning sound of ban as the same as the beginning sound of bun brick’,
etc.
-identify the ending sound of ban as the same as the ending sound of ton, thin, etc.
- how do we know that we have speech segments? We know that as a rule because we are
English native speakers.
-evidence of segments from speech errors
-slips of the tongue/spoonerisms
-you have hissed my mystery lecture
-segments as planning units in speech production
-spelling doesnt help with segments. Were working with how out mouth moves.
We hear things that are not there.
Acoustic signals do not come with segment boundaries.
-you cannot really isolate b from a or n from a in the continuous acoustic signal
The articulatory gestures for different segments are typically produced with a significant
amount of overlap.
-while your mouth is closed for b your tongue is already in position for a. Compare
with bean
www.notesolution.com
Unlock document

This preview shows page 1 of the document.
Unlock all 3 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Acoustic phonetics: physical properties of speech sounds (not covered in this course) Auditory phonetics: how sounds are heard and perceived (not covered in this course) Identify the beginning sound of ban" as the same as the beginning sound of bun" brick", etc. Identify the ending sound of ban as the same as the ending sound of ton, thin, etc. We know that as a rule because we are. Acoustic signals do not come with segment boundaries. You cannot really isolate b" from a" or n" from a" in the continuous acoustic signal. The articulatory gestures for different segments are typically produced with a significant amount of overlap. While your mouth is closed for b your tongue is already in position for a. In other words english speakers hear segments when they are not necessarily evident in the physical signal. Listeners hear segments, but they ignore things that are not useful to them.

Get access

Grade+20% OFF
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers