MGTB04FinalExamNoteswinter2013.pdf

27 Pages
166 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Management (MGM)
Course
MGMA01H3
Professor
Sam J Maglio
Semester
Winter

Description
Segmenting, Targeting, Positioning ● Basics of Segmenting ○ Identify bases and segment the market ○ develop profiles of resulting segments ● Basics of Targeting ○ Evaluate segment attractiveness ○ Select target segments ● Basics of Positioning ○ Develop positioning concepts for target segments ○ Select, develop, communicate the chosen concepts ● Carpet example ○ Can compare the importance of two or more benefits against each other and identify SEGMENTS that way ○ To choose the segment to TARGET, choose the benefit profile that looks most like your product’ ○ To figure out the way you must POSITION your product, promote the benefit profile that serves the chosen segment best ● Segmentation ○ Identify bases and segment the market ○ Develop profiles of resulting segments ○ Separating prospective buyers into groups such that, within a group: ■ Similiarity is HIGH ● Similarity between groups is LOW ■ Needs are common ■ Responses to marketing action are similar ○ What makes good segmentation? ■ Large enough to sell to ■ Identifiable ■ Distinctive ■ Stable ○ Bases for segmenting consumer markets ■ Personal characteristics of the consumer ● Demographics ○ Easily measurable vital statistics ○ Gender ○ Race/ethnicity ○ Age ○ Income ● Psychographics and lifestyle ○ First used in marketing ~40 years ago ○ Goal: create new forms of measures that focus more on consumption, less on other ○ Distinct: Activities, Interests, Opinions (AIO) ○ Combined: VALS ○ VALS Dimensions ■ Primary motivation ● What about self/world governs activities? ● Ideals ● Achievement ● Self­expression ■ Resources ● How many resources each group has ● Differentiate innovators from survivors ● Innovators: successful, take­charge people with high self esteem. They like to express themselves, have varied lives. Are active buyers of consumer products ○ Thinkers: motivated by ideals. Mature, satisfied, comfortable, reflective people who value order, knowledge and responsibility. Typically conservative but are open to new ideas that fit their framework. ● Survivors live narrowly focused lives. Few resources. Comfortable with the familiar, primarily concerned with safety and security. Focus on meeting needs than fulfilling desires. Little primary motivation. ● Geographic segmentation ○ Regional segmentation ○ ZIP clustering ■ Distinct marketing for similar types of neighborhoods across the nation ■ Benefits sought by the consumer ● Focus is on benefits people are seeking in consuming a given product or service ● Assumption: ○ The benefits people are seeking in consuming a given product are the basic reasons for the exitence of true segments ● Attempts to measure: ○ Consumer value systems ■ Comfort seekers, Trendsetters, Bargain Hunters, Wear and Tearers, Convenience Seekers ○ Perceptions of various brands in product class ■ True Religion vs Wranglers Jeans ■ Systematic, product­related behaviors of the consumer ● Focus is on degree of brand loyality, amount of brand usage, etc. ● Often the measure is behavioral in nature ○ Purchase frequency ■ Heavy­user argument or 80­20 rule ○ Brand switching rates ● Targeting ○ Evaluate segment attractiveness ■ Market opportunities for profit ● Segment size ● Growth rate/potential ■ Competitive intensity ● Unserved needs? ● Competitors strengths? ■ Company fit ● With objectives ● With competencies ● With customer base ● With resources ○ Select target segments ■ Criterion for picking target segments ■ Mobil example ● Found 5 segments instead of one (price conscious) in the buyers of gasoline ● Road warriors ○ 16% ● True Blues ○ 16% ● Generation F3 ○ 27%; largest segment ● Homebodies ○ 21% ● Price Shoppers ○ 20%; third smallest and obviously not the most important segment! ■ Product line segmentation ● One company may have different product lines that appeal to different segments ○ Old Navy vs GAP vs Banana Republic ○ Old Navy: families, very price conscious ○ GAP: young, fashionable, less price conscious ○ Banana Republic: older men with larger incomes ● Positioning ○ The act of framing the company’s image and offer in the target consumers’ minds so it occupies a distinct and value place in relation to competitors ○ The product’s position: ■ The actual image/perception of the product in the minds of consumers, relative to the competition ○ Positioning statement ■ To customers who are (target summary) ■ Our product offers (state the benefits of the product that accurately represent the benefit profile of the targeted consumer) ■ Relative to (competitive alternatives) ○ Positioning strategy questions to ask about your own product ■ Which positions are of greatest value to our target customers, given their needs? ■ Which of these positions are ‘taken’ and which are relatively free of competition? ■ Which of these available positions fits best with our objectives and our distinctive capabilities? ■ Can we ‘change the rules’ of the game by discovering new critical points of differentation? ■ Are all our positioning messages consistent? ○ Different positioning strategies ■ By attribute (baking soda toothpaste) ● Weak unless it’s the only product that offers these attributes ■ By benefit (24 hour heartburn relief) ● Pretty strong, but like the attribute the strength depends on the uniqueness ■ By price/quality (The Bay vs Dollarama) ● Strong in some segments, weak in others ■ By use/occasion (NyQuil) ● Ties in with benefit ■ By product user (Gerber ‘Graduates’) ● Very strong as it speaks directly to the user ■ With respect to product class (7­Up, the Un­cola) ● Can be either strong or weak ■ With respect to competitor (Avis, the number 2) ● Can be either strong or weak ■ By emotion (Got milk?) ● Very strong, best when combined with product user and benefit! ○ Positioning analysis ■ The key to positioning is to determine: ● the needs of consumers along important benefit dimensions ● consumers’ perceptions of all existing products/firms in the market along each of these dimensions ■ Summarized by a perceptual map ● two most important attributes or benefits ● brand locations: consumers’ perceptions ● Marketing research ○ Overview ■ Process of: ● Defining a marketing problem/opportunity ● collecting and analyzing information ● Recommending actions for improvement ■ Monitoring of: ● Customers, competition, context (PEST) ■ Eyes and ears of the corporation ● Helps you get close to your customers ○ Types of research methods and examples ■ Exploratory: focus, projective, observation ● Involves small samples; non­structured data collection ● Provides initial insights, ideas or problem understanding ● Should not be used to recommend final action ● Two main methods ○ Focus groups/depth interviews ■ Also referred to as ‘qualitative research’ ■ A monitored group discussion ● Focused on topics from a discussion leader ● Express own views, respond to others’ ■ Best for premilinary research ● Followed up by surveys or experiments ■ Depth interviews: similar but with a single person and not a group ■ Applications: ● Perceptions, opinions, behaviors ● Product planning ● Advertising ­ concepts or content ■ Advantages: ● Rich data, versatile interaction style ■ Disadvantages: ● Lack of generalizability, high cost ○ Projective techniques ■ Unstructured and indirect questioning which encourages respondents to project their underlying motivations, beliefs, or attitudes. ■ Examples: ● Word association (Hummer = ?) ● Sentence completion (AmEx users are ___?) ■ Pros ● get tough responses ­ unwilling and subconscious ■ Cons: ● requires skilled interpreter, risk of bias ○ Observation ■ Systematic recording of behavioral patterns ■ Interaction with targets ­ sometimes yes, some no ■ Cons: only behavior, no underlying info ■ Pro: track info people won’t tell you ■ Descriptive: surveys ● Greater structure: pre­determined questions ● Methods: phone, mail, in person, web­based ● Evaluation: time, cost, length, response rates ● Advantages: ○ attitudes, interests, classification, convenience ● Disadvantages: ○ requires considerable judgment when forming the survey ○ risk of bias ○ (don’t use leading, ambiguous, or unanswerable questions!) ■ Causal: experiments ● Attempt made to specify the nature of the functional or causal relationship between two or more variables in the problem model ● Example: ○ Bed advertisement, one shows a woman holding a baby, one shows a man holding a baby ○ The one that showed a man had higher response rates Price (the first of the four P’s) ● Price ○ Many names (tuition, rent, fee, dues, wage, interest, advance, deposit) but has one definition: the amount of money a consumer pays for a good or service of value ○ Economic framework ■ Customer value ● A measure of how much a customer is willing to pay for a product or a service (reservation price) ○ Perceived Value vs Price vs Cost ○ 3 Cases: ■ PV > Price > Cost (value pricing; good show of value) ● PV can equal Price but then it is not value pricing, but cost pricing ■ Price > PV > cost (pricing mistake, must adjust) ■ Price > Cost > PV (doomed product) ■ Measuring customer value ● Price elasticity ○ % change in quantity demanded / % change in price ○ High (above 1): Elastic demand ■ Small change in price produces large change in demand ○ Low (under 1): Inelastic demand ■ a small change in price produces a smaller change in demand ○ Equal to 1: Unitary elastic demand ■ a change in price produces an equivalent change in demand ○ Factors affecting price elasticity ■ Availability of substitutes ■ Uniqueness (Heinz ketchup) ■ Difficulty of comparisons (Different SKUs) ■ Importance (gas, cigarettes) ■ Ability to stockpile (tomatoes, fresh vs canned) ● Economic value to customer ○ Identify life cycle ○ Identify cost elements ○ Identify Total Lifecycle Cost ○ Determine Equivalent Units of Comparison Product ○ Repeat Steps 2+3 for Comparison ● Survey methods ○ Willingness to pay for Branded vs Generic ○ Dollarmetric method ■ Compare brands and extra amount willing to pay to get the more preferred opposed to generic ○ Gabor­Grainger method ■ Single product ■ Random exposure to multiple price points ■ Would you buy the product at $X? ■ Plot no. of affirmatives on each price point to obtain demand curve ○ Brand Price Trade­Off (BPTO) ■ matrix of brands and prices ­ choose one ■ prices adjusted after each choice ■ Pricing Objectives ● Cost Oriented approaches (From Marketing Math) ○ Types: standard markup; cost­plus ○ Problems: ignores customer (demand) & competition; which costs to consider? ● Profit Oriented Approaches ○ Types: target profit; target profit­on­sales ○ Problem: ignores customer (demand) & competition; difficult to predict sales volume ● Competition Oriented Approaches ○ Types: above/at par/below; loss leader; product­line pricing ■ Loss leader: sale of a product at or below its cost in order to stimulate demand for other, more profitable items (decreasing the price of jelly to sell more peanut butter) ■ Product Line Pricing: different pricing depending on product line and perceived value/added benefit ○ Problems: ignores customer (demand) ● Demand Oriented approaches ○ Use buyer’s PV rather than seller cost ○ Start with the price you want to charge ○ Work backward to create cost structure ○ Examples: ■ Bundle pricing (Extra Value Meals at Mcdonalds) ■ Value pricing ■ Prestige pricing (Stella in US, Black Card) ■ Yield management pricing ■ Strategy and tactics ● Bundle pricing (Extra Value Meals at Mcdonalds) ● Value pricing ● Prestige pricing (Stella in US, Black Card) ● Yield management pricing (plane seats) ○ Pricing Decisions ○ Psychological Framework ■ Perceptions of price differences ● Formation of reference prices ○ Suggested prices ○ Order effects ■ Direct mail catalogues ■ Eye­level stocking in retail stores ○ Previous purchases ● Odd­Even pricing effect ($2.99 vs $3.00; $47 vs $50) ● Weber­Fechner Law (Impact of Relative Differences) ○ People see price differences in relative terms (percentage), not only in absolute terms ■ Reference prices ● Standard of comparison against which an observed price is compared ● Internal: Influenced by consumer’s time and experiences ○ Fair price; usual price; last price; average price ● External: Influenced by consumer’s context ○ MSRP; what it’s near; $ for others in the product line ○ Decoy effect: add a decoy to increase relative value to influence consumer decision (e.g. Economist subscription) ■ Mental accounting ● People are naive accountants! ○ consider gains and losses separately ○ weigh losses more than gains ○ code outcomes as losses vs. gains relative to reference point ○ may or may not combine (a) losses (b) gains (c) losses with gains ○ In general, amount within account are equivalent; amounts across accounts are not ● Example: going to the theater ○ Losing a $10 bill before purchase: more likely to buy a ticket. Separate account for ticket cost and lost money (imagine that $10 was going to buy food) ○ Losing the ticket after purchase: less likely to buy another ticket. Same account for both ticket and money (that ticket was bought already! Night ruined) ● Choosing gas station: ○ Gives 10% discount if cash is paid (60% chose) ○ Gives 10% surcharge if credit card is paid (40% chose) ● Losses feel larger than gains ● As amount increases, marginal effect on value gets smaller ● Prospect Theory: questions to ask ○ When to bundle? ■ Multiple gains ■ Multiple losses ■ Given a large gain but a small loss ■ Given a large loss but a small gain ● Endowment Effect ○ Option 1: $5/month fee for checking account (30%) ○ Option 2: $1500 minimum balance in checking, no fee (70%) ● Investing ○ Paul owns Company A stock. Could have switched to Company B but didn’t. Lost out on $1200. ■ Feels less regretful for doing the more conservative thing ○ George owned stock in Company B. Switched to Company A. Lost out on $1200. ■ Feels more regretful for switching ○ Regrets in the short­term concern action, but long­term regrets concern inaction ■ I would regret eating a delicious burrito and ending up with the shits more than my friend would regret missing out on the delicious burrito (consider that neither of us know either’s position) ■ At the same time, I would regret not pursuing my dreams more than I would regret taking the risk to do so. ● Price bundling ○ Ski Vacation: Person A ■ Early spring, 6­day trip, given six 1­day tickets $40 each ■ Skis more ○ Ski Vacation: Person B ■ Early spring, 6­day trip, one six­day pass, $240 ■ Skis less ○ This result is because the ‘cost’ of the missed day is obvious ○ Same goes for gyms Place (the second of the four Ps) ● Place ○ Deals with distribution and sales channels/funnels ○ Distribution decisions ■ Importance and Functions of Distribution ■ Types of Distribution systems ● Indirect (e.g. agents, wholesalers, retailers) ○ Types and distinction ○ Channel decisions, channel conflict ○ Retailing ● Direct (e.g. own sales force, direct marketing) ○ Sales management ■ Why do we need distribution? ● Transactional function ○ buying, selling, negotiating, risk taking ● Logistical function ○ assorting, storing, sorting, transportation ● Facilitating function ○ financing, grading, providing information ■ Examples of distribution systems ● Schwans: Producer > Consumer ● General Motors: Producer > Retailer > Consumer ● Mars: Producer > Wholesaler > Retailer > Consumer ● Suzhou Jaeden Garment Co: Producer > Agent > Wholesaler > Retailer > Consumer ■ Why are channels important? ● Affects every other element of marketing mix ● Relatively long­term and complex relationships ■ Length of the channel system ● Direct (own sales force) ○ Advantages of direct: ■ Control over distribution functions ■ Better satisfy customer needs ■ Cost effective (if large enough volume base) ● Indirect (through intermediaries) ○ Different ways of going indirect ■ Corporate systems: owns, operates a vertically integrated, ‘captive’ ● Example: forward (Polo); backward (grocery) ● Advantage: control, customer service ● Disadvantage: investments ■ Contractual systems: with independent intermediaries ● Example: franchising ● Types: trade names (gas); format (Domino’s) ● Advantages: no experience needed, easy help, control ● Disadvantages: overcharging, vulnerable, fly­by­night operators ■ Conventional systems: selling to independent intermediaries ● Advantages: risk reduction, efficiency ● Disadvantages: lack of coordination, instability ■ Width/Breadth/density of the channel ● Types (in a given market area) ○ Intensive distribution: ■ as many as possible (e.g. soft drinks) ■ convenience, high frequency buying ○ Selective distribution: ■ limited no. of outlets ■ Speciality, low frequency buying ○ Example: Tim Hortons vs. Gucci ■ Image, display, price are different ■ Channel Modifications ● Reasons ○ Competitive ○ New customer segment ○ New region ■ Channel Conflict ● Location: ○ Vertical: Manufacturer ­ Retailer ○ Horizontal: Retailer ­ Retailer ■ Retailing: All activities involved in selling, rent, and providing goods and services to ultimate consumers ● Classification of retail outlets ○ Ownership: independent, corporate chain, contractual ○ Service levels: full service <=> limited service ○ Merchandise: specialty, category ‘killer’ (eBay) ● Retail positioning matrix ○ Value added includes: ■ Location (e.g. 7­eleven) ■ Reliability (e.g. Mcdonalds) ■ Prestige (e.g. The Bay) ○ Similar to the segment matrix Product (the third P: seriously, study this hard! At least one short answer will be on NPD) ● Product ○ New Products ■ Terminology ● a product is anything that can be offered to a market for attention, acquisition, use or consumption ● Can be a physical object, service, person (not like that), place, organization, idea, or a combination of the above ● Seller view: ○ A bundle of tangible and intangible attributes designed to provide benefits to the customer ● Customer view: ○ A bundle of tangible and intangible benefits ● Must manage both the attributes the company assembles and the benefits the customer perceives and receives ● Definitions and distinctions ○ Product line: the set of products offered within a certain category or subcategory ○ Product mix: the set of product lines ○ durable vs. nondurable ○ Consumer vs. industrial ○ Convenience, shopp
More Less

Related notes for MGMA01H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit