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Quick-review of chapter 5 terms

5 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens

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Chapter 5
Sensation The detection of the elementary properties of a stimulus.
Perception detection of the more complex properties of a stimulus, including its location and
nature, involving learning
Transduction The conversion of physical stimuli into changes in the activity of receptor cells of
sensory organs
Receptor cell Neuron that directly responses to a physical stimuli
Anatomical Coding A means by which the nerves system represents information; different features are
coded by the activity of different neurons
Temporal Coding A means by which the nervous system represents information; different features
are coded by the pattern of activity of neurons (firing faster/slower)
Just-noticeable difference (jnd)the smallest difference between two similar stimuli that can be
disguised; also called threshold.
Weber fraction Ratio between a just-noticeable difference and the magnitude of a stimulus;
reasonably constant over the middle range of most stimulus intensities.
ThresholdThe point at which a stimulus, or a change in the value of a stimulus, can be
detected
Different Thresholdjnd
Absolute thresholdmin. Value a stimulus can be detected
Signal detection theorya mathematical theory of the detection of stimuli, which involves discriminating a
signal from the noise in which it is embedded and which takes into account
participants willingness to report detecting the signal.
ROC curvereceiver operating characteristic curvea graph of hits and false alarms of
participants under different motivational conditions, indicates peoples ability to
detect a particular stimulus
Wavelength The distance between adjacent waves of radiant energy; in vision, most closely
associated with the perceptual dimension of hue
Cornea transparent tissue covering the front of the eye
Sclera tough outer layer of the eye; the eye white
Iristhe pigmented muscle of the eye that controls the size of the pupil
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Lens transparent organ situated behind the iris of the eye, helps focus an image on the retina
Accommodations changes in the thickness of the lens to focus objects
Retina the tissie at the back inside surface of the eye that contains the photoreceptors and associated
neurons
Photoreceptors receptive cell for vision in the retina; rod or cone
Optic diskcircular structure located at the exit point from the retina of the axons of the
ganglion cells that form the optic nerve
Bipolar cellsa neuron in the retina that receives information from photoreceptors and passes it
to the ganglion cells from which axons proceed through the optic nerves to the
brain
Ganglion cellsneuron in the retina that receives information from photoreceptors by means of
bipolar cells and from which axons proceed through the optic nerve to the brain
Rod a photoreceptor that is very sensitive to light but cannot detect changes in hue (about 125 million
per eye)
Cone a photoreceptor that is responsible for acute daytime vision and for colour perception (about 6
million per eye)
Fovea a small pit near the center of the retina containing densely packed cones, responsible for the most
acute and detailed vision
Photopigment a complex molecule found in photoreceptors; when struck by light, it splits and
stimulates the membrane of photoreceptors in which it resides
Rhodopsin photopigment in rods
Dark adaptation the process by which the eye becomes capable of distinguishing dimly lit objects
after going from a bright area to a dark one (rate of regeneration of rhodosin >
rate of bleaching)
Vergence movement the co-operative movement of the eyes, which ensures that the image of an object
falls on identical portions of both retinas
Saccadic movementrapid movement of the yes that is used in scanning a visual scene
Pursuit movementmovement that the eyes make to maintain an image if a moving image upon the
fovea
Hue perceptual dimension of colour, most closely related to the wavelength of a pure light
Brightness perceptual dimension of colour, how bright shit is
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Chapter 5 Sensation The detection of the elementary properties of a stimulus. Perception detection of the more complex properties of a stimulus, including its location and nature, involving learning Transduction The conversion of physical stimuli into changes in the activity of receptor cells of sensory organs Receptor cell Neuron that directly responses to a physical stimuli Anatomical Coding A means by which the nerves system represents information; different features are coded by the activity of different neurons Temporal Coding A means by which the nervous system represents information; different features are coded by the pattern of activity of neurons (firing fasterslower) Just-noticeable difference (jnd) the smallest difference between two similar stimuli that can be disguised; also called threshold. Weber fraction Ratio between a just-noticeable difference and the magnitude of a stimulus; reasonably constant over the middle range of most stimulus intensities. Threshold The point at which a stimulus, or a change in the value of a stimulus, can be detected Different Threshold jnd Absolute threshold min. Value a stimulus can be detected Signal detection theory a mathematical theory of the detection of stimuli, which involves discriminating a signal from the noise in which it is embedded and which takes into account participants willingness to report detecting the signal. ROC curve receiver operating characteristic curve a graph of hits and false alarms of participants under different motivational conditions, indicates peoples ability to detect a particular stimulus Wavelength The distance between adjacent waves of radiant energy; in vision, most closely associated with the perceptual dimension of hue Cornea transparent tissue covering the front of the eye Sclera tough outer layer of the eye; the eye white Iris the pigmented muscle of the eye that controls the size of the pupil www.notesolution.com
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