Study Guides (256,486)
CA (124,666)
UTSC (8,077)
Religion (203)
RLGA02H3 (122)
David Perley (101)

Christianity Terms and Outline of Key Concepts

8 Pages
107 Views

Department
Religion
Course Code
RLGA02H3
Professor
David Perley

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 8 pages of the document.
KEY TERMS FOR QUIZ #2
Apostles: The first generation of Jesus followers. All of Jesus 12 disciples were apostles,
and some wrote the different Gospels, which recount the different perspectives on Jesus
life.
Pentecost: The fiftieth day after Easter, commemorated as the dramatic occasion when
Jesus followers experienced the presence of the Holy Spirit.
Evangelical: In Germany, a name for the Lutheran Church; in the English-speaking world,
a description of conservative Protestants with a confident sense of the assurance of the
divine grace and the obligation to preach it.
Christ: From the Greek Christos, a translation of the Hebrew word for messiah,
anointed. Jesus was believed to be a messiah and therefore became referred to as Jesus
the Christ to represent this. In the many different accounts of Jesus life in the gospels, we
see Jesus referred to as many different things: the saviour of the Gentiles, the master of the
Torah, etc. Jesus is referred to as Jesus the Christ because he is believed to be the
messiah, or the king of the Jews, in certain contexts.
Bishop: The supervising priest of an ecclesiastical district called a diocese. In the
beginning of the development of the tradition, although Paul was attempting to manage
things, there was no real authority. As the development continues, each area gets a
manager; these managers were called bishops, and were overseers or managers of the
religion for a particular region. Three major bishops at the earliest time were the Bishop of
Rome which was the centralized authority, whose job it was to notify the other Bishops on
what was happening in the development of the tradition, the Bishop of Antioch and the
Bishop of Alexandria. In the modern context, the Bishop of Rome is the Pope, or father of
the Bishops/ Church who mediates Christians connection with the divine.
Canon: When Christianity became the established religion of the Roman Empire, church
leaders made a list of the writings they acknowledged to be scripture. This list is also
referred to as the canon, and is what Christians know as the New Testament. It includes
the gospels. Originally, the authors of the gospels were not named, but in the 2nd century
CE, they were named because the tradition was in search of a canon, or an authorized
collection of works, naming them provided a sort of stamp of authority that added
www.notesolution.com
credibility to them. The search for a canon in the tradition lead to the naming of the
authors of the gospels.
Crucifix: A cross with an image of the suffering Jesus mounted on it. Symbolic of
Jesus`self-sacrifice for the tradition, showing his martyrdom. An image representing his
crucifixion which plays a crucial role in the story of his life. Jesus was arrested and charged
with treason and he takes his punishment of crucifixion but is said to be resurrected by
God.
Eucharist: The ritual re-enactment of Jesus sacrifice of himself, patterned after his sharing
of bread and wine as his body and blood at the final Passover meal with his disciples.
Orthodox Christians term it the liturgy, Catholics the mass, and Protestants the Lord`s
Supper or Holy Communion.
Gospel: Good News, the accounts of Jesus` life as told by four of his disciples, Mark,
Matthew, Luke and John. The first three are known as synoptic because they view Jesus
life quite similarly, whereas the account of John orders things differently and takes a
slightly different view. Mark sees Jesus as the savior of the Gentiles and expresses the idea
of apocalyptic urgency (we must repent now because the end is near, it could happen in our
lifetime). Matthew presents Jesus as the master of the Torah, catering more towards a
Jewish audience, gives the first account of Jesus infancy, adds Jesus divine nature and
supernatural powers to the account of him as a real human man and calls him the savior of
the Jews, or the messiah in the Jewish context. Lukes account, like Marks, presents
Jesus as the savior of the Gentiles, and portrays him as a hero for the underprivileged.
Shows his concern for the poor, women, outcasts and demonstrates that Jesus embraces
those who are marginalized in society. The fact that he was presented as the savior of the
Gentiles, indicates that this account was geared toward a Greco-Roman audience and
emphasizes that Jesus was innocent of any crime against Rome which was important for
attracting Gentiles (non-Jews) to the tradition. Johns gospel presented Jesus as the
eternal divine son of God. He was not a synoptic because he presents events in a different
order or sequence and portrays Jesus in a new way. He speaks more about the nature of
Jesus, and Jesus himself is the teaching, not exactly the history of his life. The Gospel of
Peter did not make the cut because it claimed different things: Jesus didnt die on the cross
but returned to heaven before the crucifixion. The Bishop of Antioch, taking this into
consideration, decided not to include Peters account in the gospels.
Indulgences: The initial main idea in Christianity that Luther rejected, due to its
materialism proving to be a distraction from practitioners creating a direct connection with
god, which was Luthers idea of what Christianity was supposed to be about. The ritual of
the sale of indulgences, was the practice of rich aristocrats donating money to the church.
The Church would then transform the money into spiritual merit, that they would then
www.notesolution.com
apply to relatives or ancestors of the aristocrat, essentially securing a spot for them in the
afterlife. Luther thought this act was heinous, thought it to be very materialistic and didnt
like that people could simply buy their way into heaven. He demonized the Pope and
thought this materialistic tradition distracted from people taking the time to worship God
directly and kept them from practicing as they should.
Logos: Word in the sense of eternal divine intelligence and purpose. John uses this term
in his Gospel to describe not only ‘word as a vocabulary item but also as the whole idea of
divine intelligence and purpose. A God can create the world through his word.
Orthodox: When the Christian Tradition moved east, the Eastern Orthodox Church was
established creating Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, and Romanian and Greek orthodox
sections of the religion. The Eastern religion developed autonomously and the Bishop of
Constantinople grew in power with the spread of the Eastern tradition. The Eastern
Orthodox tradition differs from the Western tradition in its ideas about how Jesus is related
to the divine. The Bishop of Rome had the idea of the Trinity, which was the idea of the
God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit. The Eastern tradition rejected the addition of the Holy
Spirit because it felt that theologically it did not make sense for the Holy Spirit to come out
of the son of God (Jesus), and this conflict proved to be a main reason for the separation of
the two Churches. The Eastern, Orthodox tradition emphasizes a real contact with the
divine in our lifetime, whereas the Western tradition believes that the only time we meet
with God is in death, therefore the two traditions vary in their consideration of “mystical
components.
Mysticism: The term is problematic because it cannot truly be given one, simple definition.
Mystical components are not always apparent in the Western tradition, however in the
Eastern Christian context, it might be something that emphasizes a direct encounter with
the divine. The Eastern tradition emphasized the importance of a union or relationship
with the divine during ones life, a unique characteristic that separated it from the Western
tradition and caused for the conflict between the two Churches. In the Eastern tradition,
the Jesus Prayer, a short prayer that was repeated like a mantra, helped to put people in
a meditative state in which they would experience the divine on their own. The veneration
of icons also has to do with the idea of mysticism, because pictures of the divine were also
used in the Eastern/Orthodox tradition as an image to worship in meditation, to achieve an
experience with God.
Excommunication: Formal expulsion from the Church, particularly the Roman Catholic
Church, for doctrinal error or moral misconduct. By 1054, the Bishop of Rome and the
Bishop of Constantinople have excommunicated, which means they have cut all ties from
each other, they have literally separated their respective traditions because they conflict on
the nature of Jesus and his relation to the divine as well as on issues of power and on how
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
KEY TERMS FOR QUIZ #2 Apostles: The first generation of Jesus followers. All of Jesus 12 disciples were apostles, and some wrote the different Gospels, which recount the different perspectives on Jesus life. Pentecost: The fiftieth day after Easter, commemorated as the dramatic occasion when Jesus followers experienced the presence of the Holy Spirit. Evangelical: In Germany, a name for the Lutheran Church; in the English-speaking world, a description of conservative Protestants with a confident sense of the assurance of the divine grace and the obligation to preach it. Christ: From the Greek Christos, a translation of the Hebrew word for messiah, anointed. Jesus was believed to be a messiah and therefore became referred to as Jesus the Christ to represent this. In the many different accounts of Jesus life in the gospels, we see Jesus referred to as many different things: the saviour of the Gentiles, the master of the Torah, etc. Jesus is referred to as Jesus the Christ because he is believed to be the messiah, or the king of the Jews, in certain contexts. Bishop: The supervising priest of an ecclesiastical district called a diocese. In the beginning of the development of the tradition, although Paul was attempting to manage things, there was no real authority. As the development continues, each area gets a manager; these managers were called bishops, and were overseers or managers of the religion for a particular region. Three major bishops at the earliest time were the Bishop of Rome which was the centralized authority, whose job it was to notify the other Bishops on what was happening in the development of the tradition, the Bishop of Antioch and the Bishop of Alexandria. In the modern context, the Bishop of Rome is the Pope, or father of the Bishops Church who mediates Christians connection with the divine. Canon: When Christianity became the established religion of the Roman Empire, church leaders made a list of the writings they acknowledged to be scripture. This list is also referred to as the canon, and is what Christians know as the New Testament. It includes the gospels. Originally, the authors of the gospels were not named, but in the 2ndcentury CE, they were named because the tradition was in search of a canon, or an authorized collection of works, naming them provided a sort of stamp of authority that added www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document


Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit