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Midterm

SOCC30; midtermnotes.docx


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCC30H3
Professor
Julian Tanner
Study Guide
Midterm

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FELSON/BOBA
CHAPTER1
DRAMATIC FALLACY
media distort crime for their own purposes, creating many of our erroneous conceptions
about crime
- states that the most publicized offenses are far more dramatic than those
commonly found in real life
- murder mix
omore likely to happen over arguments than love triangles/ money
- mass of minor offenses
omost offenses are not major, but minor
COPS AND COURTS FALLACY
importance and influence of police and courts as proactive controls over crime are
overstated
- crime comes first, justice system follows
- police do not do very much; not very much crime
NOT ME FALLACY
crime is committed by everyone, and the criminal is not much different from us
- illusion that we could never do a crime
INNOCENT YOUTH FALLACY
children are not the innocent bystanders to crime, but are overrepresented as offenders
- being young means being innocent
- often shown to be corrupted by middle aged individuals
- youth corrupts other youth
INGENUITY FALLACY
most crime is simple and most criminals are unskilled
- false image of the criminal derived from the media also creates an ingenuity
fallacy
ocriminals must be almost as crafty and tough
omost crimes today do not need advanced skills
ORGANIZED CRIME FALLACY
criminal conspiracies and, specifically, juvenile gangs are attributed much greater
organization and sophistication than they actually have
- tendency to attribute much greater organization to crime conspiracies than they
usually have
- three basic principles
oact quickly to escape detention and minimize danger from other offenders
ohave direct contact with as few co-offenders as possible to avoid betrayal
owork as little as possible to get a lot of money
- juvenile street gangs
ogroups have very loose structures; few core members
omay do evil, but it seldom does cohesive evil
AGENDA FALLACY
crime is used haphazardly by a variety of people with moral, religious, social and
political agendas to support their causes
- refers to the fact that many people have an agenda and hope you will assist them

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- purity wars/ moral panics
ointerpretations of crime and other social problems
teach and preach morality to people
they then do what’s right in practice
that prevents crime
norms do not ensure moral behavior
- religious agendas
ofelt that conversion to their faith or values will prevent crime and that
failure to do so will lead to more crime
they were just as likely in reality
- social and political agendas
oa wide array of political and social agendas has been linked to crime
prevention
- welfare state agenda
osome people hate welfare state and blame it for crime, those who like it
say they will have more social programs to reduce crime
oimproved welfare and economic changes correlated with more crime
VAGUE BOUNDARY FALLACY
crime can and should be defined so it can be studied across cultures and history while
not becoming bogged down by opinion, different laws, and peculiarities
- refers to tendency to make criminology too subjective
oallows students and instructors to wriggle out of responsibility, and keeps
crime science from developing
- clear definition of crime
odefined in historical terms is not necessarily statutory crime in all nations
of all eras
RANDOM CRIME FALLACY
crime is not random but occurs in patterned ways that coincide with our routine behavior
and everyday lives
- it eliminates personal responsibility and implies that crime cannot be prevented
ocrime is preventable and predictable
CHAPTER2
SETTING
location for recurrent behavior at known times
crime setting is where people converge or diverge; influencing their crime opportunities
- each of us spends part of the day in some settings and part in other settings,
affecting what we do ourselves and what happens to us
- some settings invite people to get drunk or abuse drugs, other settings are
sobering
STAGES OF A CRIMINAL ACT
- can be divided into three different stages
oprelude; events that lead directly up to and into the criminal act, such as
getting drunk, driving through a neighbourhood, or waiting until no one is
looking
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