AST revision.docx

6 Pages
64 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Course
AST101H1
Professor
Michael Reid
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 13 The Formation and the Age of the Solar System  Lecture 15 Terrestrial Planets: Mercury and Moon  Properties controlling volcanism and tectonics: Internal heat = planet size Properties controlling erosion (wind & rain): 1. Planet size (need a atmosphere = need for volcanism for outgassing) 2. Distance from the Sun (rain) 3. Rotation speed (faster = stronger wind and storm) Properties controlling remaining impact cratering: Planet size = if or not it has ongoing volcanism Moon: 1. Heavily cratered region: lunar highlands 2. Smooth dark region: lunar Maria 3. Radioactive decay generates internal heat and lava flows and covers lunar Maria 4. Moon is dead now Mercury: 1. Many impact craters (biggest: The Carloris Basin) 2. Volcanism once happened on Mercury 3. Many tremendous cliffs – tectonics (Mercury’s cliff probably formed as the core  shrank and the surface crumpled) 4. Mercury is geologically dead today Lecture 16 Terrestrial planets: Venus and Earth Lecture 17 Carbon Cycle and Greenhouse Effects Venus: Thick cloud – Rader mapping Few impact craters; many being erased by other geological process Volcanism: ­ Both lava plains and volcanic mountains (runny lava) ­ Convection inside Weak erosion: ­ Too hot temperature allow no rain to exist ­ Low rotation rate means it has little wind No Earth­like plate tectonics Why the lithospheres of Venus and Earth differ? Venus is too hot and no liquid water exists. Water softens Earth’s lithosphere so  Earth’s lithosphere was broken into plates by forces due to the underlying mantle  convection. The Carbon Cycle on Earth Plate tectonic seems to shut off on Venus long time ago, so it does not have carbon  cycle to regulate its temperature. What is Greenhouse effect? Visible light passes through the atmosphere and warms a planet’s surface. The  atmosphere absorbs infrared light thus trap the heat. E.g. carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane. Lecture 18 Terrestrial planets: Mars Impact cratering: Southern hemisphere has more craters = older surface Biggest crater: Hellas Basin Volcanism and Olympus Mons 1. Olympus Mons: the tallest known volcano in the solar system 2. Has ongoing volcanic activity, but may be geologically dead like Mercury and  Moon after billions of years. Tectonics and Valles Marineris Erosion on Mars Dried up riverbed shows evidence there were water erosion. Water on Mars: 1. No liquid water now on Mars because:  ­ Temperature is too cold on most places ­ Where temperature above freezing (equator) air pressure too low so that water  becomes vopour. 2. Evidence suggesting water was on Mars once: ­ Dried riverbed ­ Water­carved gullies Mars today: 1. Thin atmosphere = weak greenhouse effects = cold 2. More elliptical orbit = extreme seasons (especially in southern hemisphere) 3. Changing axis tilt changes both the severity of seasons and global temperature. 4. High winds, dust storms 5. Before Mars are warmer and it has an atmosphere Volcanic activities provide outgassing of CO2 Later on Mars lost its CO2 because Small size = interior cool down = no volcanic activities = thin atmosphere  cannot capture gas = CO2 gas lost to space Lecture 20&21 Jovian planets Planet Composition: Jupiter & Saturn ­ Hydrogen and Helium ­ Tiny little hydrogen compounds, metal  and rock in the core ­emit twice of the energy than they  receive from the Sun Uranus & Neptune ­ Hydrogen compounds ­ Small amount of metal and rock 4 Jovian
More Less

Related notes for AST101H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit