POL Reading 1 Explained (1).docx

4 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO260H1
Professor
Jeffrey Kopstein
Semester
Winter

Description
Reading 1(1): Criteria for assessing electoral systems by André Blais  ­ empirical judgments: consequences of various options  ­ normative judgments: good/bad these consequences are  electoral system – set of rules which govern process by which citizen opinion of parties is expressed in  votes  elected representative > dictator  ­ policies adopted by elected = views of majority  ­ conflict dealt with peacefully  ­ elections = congruence to what citizen want + what govt does  ­ representation by reflection = sincere vote  What should elections accomplish?   ▯accountability – incentive to be re­elected, will propose policies +   implement them   ▯representation by reflection – voters who best represent their views, interests more likely to be  protected by those similar to us   ▯fairness – not systematically biased   ▯equality  ▯each vote counts the same (legitimacy), equal rights  Why losers peacefully accept outcome  1. rights will not be infringed upon by the govt  2. have possibility to win another time  3. procedure is legit  effective govt > stable govt  ­ stability – same govt rule over long period of time?  ­ Effective – manages the state  ­ Effective = implement policies advocated during campaign period vs. accommodative = consult  widely with many groups before coming to a conclusion   Debate on electoral systems­ • Is too much stability a good or not enough? • An effective government would state that too much stability is undermining. Working closely  with the cabinet stabilizes just enough  • Many times when one person has all the power issues arise  • Accommodating government is key • Parties need to be formed and ballots should have many options • Simplicity is good in a government so is transparency  • A government should be fair, equal, effective, have cohesion and provide freedom • Voting process should be fair Reading 1(2): Perils of Presidentialism by Juan Linz  Parliamentary  ­ most stable democracies = parliamentary  ▯power comes from legislative branch  ­ gov’t power is completely dependent on parliaments  ­ flexibility to the political process ­ basic changes, realignment, make or break PM  ­ power sharing + coalition  ­ there is opposition to policies  ­ aka “consociation democracy”  ­if they have major seats, PM will tend towards presidential too  • Democratic governance of state  • Executive branches derive in democratic legitimacy • Held accountable to legislature  • Executive/legislative branches interconnected  • Head of state different person then head of government  • Have constitutional monarchies  • Example: Canada Presidential  ­ president = full control of cabinet + administration + executive power + head of state  ­ has strong claim to democracy  ­ fixed term in office  ­ some gain office with less votes than prime ministers  ­ conflicts arises when the legislature and president disagree with each other  ­ personalization of power  ­ very rigid process  ▯guards against instability  ­ winner take all winner take all/zero sum game  ­ opposition = irksome  ­ no coalition, alliances  ­ fixed term in office  ­ allows ppl too pick chief exec openly  ­ [Bagehot] “deferential” – hard to be head of state AND follow party  ­ [Hirschman] “the wish of the vouloir conclure” –
More Less

Related notes for BIO260H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit