ESS105H1Lecture1.docx

3 Pages
131 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Earth Sciences
Course
ESS105H1
Professor
Damian Dupuy
Semester
Winter

Description
ESS105H1 Jan 6 /14th Prof. Lisa Tully How does this discipline fit in with the bigger picture? Introduction 1) Geoscientist­what do they do? Look for resources e.g. diamonds, gold, oil, gas ­Volcanic activity: research around volcanoes to determine safe areas to build houses, look into  the past of volcanoes to deduce whether they are active or dormant  ­Mapping the seafloor and other remote areas of the world using technology such as SONAR  (sound propagation) ­Related to paleontology: looking at fossils and their age  ­Earthquakes are messages from the center of the earth, what’s happening in the crust, ­Finding resources in the crust e.g. oil and gas ­Finding ground water, freshwater! Particularly important for areas that are not close to direct  sources of freshwater ­Environmental geoscientists: cleaning up the mess of mines and other pollution. 2) Geology­what is it? ­Study of the earth and its processes that change and shape it, for example: earthquakes, plate  tectonics, wind ­Geologic time: 4.56 billion years old (latest estimate of Earth’s age)  ­Plate tectonics: the unifying theory of geology ­Other processes: Rock cycles, major land forms, volcanoes, tsunamis, etc.  3) How does geology influence us? ­Water: resource, crops, (floodplains has rich soil, river brings minerals to riverbed), potentially  cause flooding  ­Rockslides, mudslides ­Volcano: the soil around a volcano is very rich in nutrients ­Fault: a break in the rocks, possibly cause earthquakes ­Natural resources: many iron mines are clustered in the Canadian Shield, many copper mines  are located along the Rockies  ­Canada’s physiographic regions: Rockies, plains (Saskatchewan prairies), Great Lakes (within  the Canadian Shield area), Maritimes  ­What do continents have different regions? What stories do landscapes tell?  ­Gneiss: 20 kilometers down, records intense deformation at great depths when crustal blocks collided to  make up the crustal mosaic that comprises the oldest part of Canada, consistency of slowly­moving  toothpaste, base of the mountains that gets worn away by wind, water, etc. You can walk on gneiss and see what happened to the old mountains that used to exist ­Rockies: some are so high in elevation, snow does not melt, it accumulates overtime and turns to glacier ­Glaciers can be a source of freshwater: rivers from the Himalayas are fed from the glaciers from the high  mountain tops ­Sinkhole: whole chunks of city falls down, more likely to happen with carbonate (soft) rocks, e.g.  limestone  ­Carbonate rock is dissolved easily by acidic water, slowly overtime (even natural rain is a bit acidic)  enlarges the hole underground gradually, with the cave growing underground with a building on top,  eventually the roof is going to collapse and everything falls into the cave­hole  ­Karst: an area of rock that has been dissolved by acidic waters If you ever walk around a graveyard…the gravestones made by soft rock will have been dissolved by  acidic rain overtime, and you will not be able to read the engravings So, make your tombstones out of hard rock so it will last. British Columbia: many volcano
More Less

Related notes for ESS105H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit