The Gold Standard and the Great Depression.docx
The Gold Standard and the Great Depression.docx

6 Pages
147 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of Toronto St. George
Department
Economics
Course
ECO342Y1
Professor
Paul Cohen
Semester
Fall

Description
The Gold Standard and the Great Depression, 1919­1939 Barry Eichengreen The Legacy of Hyperinflation Introduction • Before stabilizing her currency in 1924, Germany endured one of the most extreme  hyperinflations in recorded history • By summer of 1922, prices were rising at rates of more than 50% a month  ▯summer of  1993 by more than 100 percent  ▯for a brief period in the autumn inflation rate exceed  1000% a month with prices doubling or tripling in a week • Shocks to confidence that prompted flight from the mark, igniting the vicious spiral of  currency depreciation and inflation, significantly widened the budgetary gap by raising  the cost of the goods and services purchased by the public sector more quickly than its  revenues  • Both schools of thought have some truth in them o Fiscal view is correct insofar as the budget would have been in deficit,  eventually necessitating money creation, even without inflation and currency  depreciation o The balance­of­payments view is correct in that inflation and currency  depreciation, once underway added to fiscal crisis  • The root of cause of the inflation was the same one that prevented other European  countries from stabilizing their currencies in the early 1920s; and absence of consensus  regarding tax incidence and income distribution o Germany the domestic distributional conflict was aggravated by the  international dispute over reparations and consequently manifested itself in a  particularly virulent form  • Countries were still driven by the feat that old wounds would be reopened if the  compromise  that the gold standard symbolized was allowed to disintegrate  ▯even  when inflation reached catastrophic heights governments stood ready to defend their  gold parties at any cost The Background: Reparations • Establishing and maintaining a fixed gold parity required the capacity to fend off  speculative attacks  ▯capacity derived from two ingredients: credibility and cooperation • Required a budget balanced inclusive of transfers so that the would be no pressure to  print money for financial fiscal deficits • Until the dispute over reparations subsided neither form of collaboration could be  regularized  ▯none of the prerequisites for monetary stability was present until 1924 • France – “the Boche will pay”  ▯rehabilitating France’s northeastern departments where  most of the war took place required expensive infusion of capital • By linking reparations to the conditions of the German economy, the Allies diminished  the incentive for German policymakers to put their domestic house in order  ▯politicians   were not encouraged to implement painful programs designed to promote growth by the  knowledge that the fruits of their labor would be transferred abroad • Anything that depressed trade n Germany depressed trade throughout central Europe • Economics instability in Central Europe, Bolshoevik threat from the east, Anglo­French  conflicts over spheres of influence in Easter Europe undermined the spirit of  cooperation developed during the war  ▯prospects for compromise among Allies grew  increasing remote • “Interim payments” of gold, war material, public property in ceded territories and  colonies where justified as a way of defraying occupations costs  ▯regarded as the first  installment of reparations o 8 billion gold marks by May 1921  ▯20% of German national income and only  40% of the interim payment specified at Versailles • More than the presence of occupation forces or the political climate, the key factor in  the interim transfer was Germany’s hope that a demonstration of good will would elicit  Allied concessions and permit the early extinction of reparations  • The fiscal implications of the transfer were accommodated by tax reforms  ▯the tax  increase was essential for maintaining fiscal balance in the face of the interim transfer o The interim transfer provoked neither capital flight or currency deprecation, the  revenue base of the new income tax was not eroded by inflation  • Given American inflexibility regarding war debts, the prospects for French, Italian, and  British compromise on reparation appeared increasingly bleak • The reparation bill of 132 billion gold marks in which Germany was to begin services  immediately for 50B of the 132B • All that was certain was that Germany would be obligated to make substantial transfer  over a period of decades • The problem for Germany was how to mobilize for transfer 10% of national income  and to reduce both present and future consumption without provoking domestic  political unrest  o Transforming 10% of national income into foreign currency required an external  surplus equivalent to 80% of 1921­22 exports o Strict controls modeled on wartime practice reduced German imports  significantly  ▯to export 80% it needed a further increase in imported inputs • Even had Germany somehow been able to provide this astonishing increase in exports,  the Allies would have been unwilling to accept it  ▯the German exports would be  heavily concentrated n the products of industries already characterized by intense  international competition: iron, steel, textiles and coal • That 1920­21 was a period of recession aggravated both problems: those of Germany’s  ability to export and the Allies willingness to import • Just as political constraints limited the Allies willingness to absorb reparations, they  limited Germany’s capacity to mobilize them  ▯living standards had fallen significantly  since 1913m raising the specter of unrest if the government attempted to divert 10% of  national income remained toward the payment of reparation • However, Germany delivered 75% of scheduled reparation in the year since May1921 • German politicians were not able to agree on the form of the tax – Socialists advocated  a levy on wealth while others favored additional sales taxation o Backing for tax increases was diluted by the knowledge that the fruits of all  sacrifices would be transferred abroad  • Opposition to tax increases did not enhance the Reich’s ability to market bonds  ▯ increasingly the government was forced to finance its deficits with money creation  • It became clear that no reduction would be forthcoming, capital flows reversed  direction, setting the stage for hyperinflation The Transition to Hyperinflation • As a result of wartime controls, the rate of currency depreciation lagged behind the rate  of price inflation between 1914 and 1918  ▯as soon as the price increases accelerated  the exchange rate made up lost ground • Once the inflationary trend became evident, exchange rate depreciation therefore began  to outstrip the rise in domestic prices • The relationship between depreciation and competitiveness then grew increasingly  complex  ▯whenever the foreign exchanges stabilized as in the first half of 1921, price  setters used the breathing space to recover lost ground  ▯pushed real exchange rate back   down toward prior levels • The dollar question replaced the weather as a topic for small talk and became the  decisive factor in setting German prices o Large firms converted mark receipts into foreign currency as quickly as possible • By the final months of the inflation, prices were adjusted daily or even hourly in  response to changes in the exchange rate, all but eliminating the lag between  depreciation and inflation  • The mark declined abruptly following the London Ultimatum in May and the partition  of Upper Silesia • Depreciation accelerated with the wroth of domestic political discord and the  assassination of Walter Ratheneau the foreign minister views as spokesman for  moderate elements • 1992 – Poincare rather an being willing to compromise on reparations was prepared to  extract them by force • January 1923 – Ruhr invasion further drastic depreciation of the mark • These events destabilized the exchange rate by producing expectations of inflation  fueled by money creation • By the 3ed quarter of 19323 the government could hardly issue bonds, since the  collapse of its revenues implied the collapse of its debt­servicing capacity  ▯only  recourse was to purchase government paper and monetize the deficit o Essentially the fiscal view: mounting budget deficits leading to money creation  and an explosive spiral of inflation and depreciation • Keynes – if reoperations moratorium was declared and confidence resorted the budget  would swing into balance o O pressure for monetization and inflation could be brought under control o If not deficits would results and lead to acceleration of inflation, shattering  Ge
More Less

Related notes for ECO342Y1

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit