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ENG202Y1- Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 15 pages long!)


Department
English
Course Code
ENG202Y1
Professor
Carroll Balot
Study Guide
Midterm

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UTSG
ENG202Y1
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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ENG202 Introduction to English Literature
English Literary Periods
o Medieval (6th century to 1485 or 1304)
Dissolution of W. Rome leads to factional European states
Old English/Anglo-Saxon language followed by Old English
o Early Modern/Renaissance (1485-1660)
Elizabethan/end of the Tudor period followed by Jacobean
o Restoration (1660-1702)
English civil war and monarchic conflicts
o 18th century
Enlightenment: age of Reason (Augustan/Neoclassical art) followed by Age of
“esiility Age of Johso
o 19th century (Romantic era)
Early history and literature of Britain/Europe
o Up to the medieval era
Germanic invaders and others cause the collapse of W. Roman Empire
Outlying imperial provinces abandoned by Roman occupiers, incl. Britain
o Medieval period
Peaceful settling OR hostile takeover (?) of Germanic tribes in Celtic Britain
Monastic literary tradition in Latin encounters poetic tradition of
Germanics; written poems derived from oral traditions
King Alfred unsuccessfully attempts to standardize English across dialects,
commissions translations of certain works from Latin
Early English literary tradition in vernacular preserved in codices
Norman (French) conquest leads to upheaval of English culture and language
Theism: centrality of the divine in life, literature, etc.
Perfect life lived in imitation of the divine; history guided by divine
providence and the will of god
Work of the artist/scholar is discerning spiritual meaning
o Renaissance: Petrarch, Dante et al. assert continuity with classical lit
Following theism, Humanism: ultimate position of man within the world
The Dream of the Rood
o English poem from early centuries
o Rood: the rod, cross, crucifix
Ruthwell Cross: artifact containing lines from this poem
o Drea isio gere
Some roots in philosophical tradition
Rood author visited by divine entity in dream; specifically, the cross
o The cross itself talks about its own humiliation and glory
Christia relis edoed ith supernatural powers; divine vehicles
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1. ENG202 – Renaissance Sonnets
Context for Renaissance Sonnets
1. Symbol of Queen Elizabeth; her image evocative of the Virgin Mary
1. Became a pseudo-holy relic; medieval structures of devotion now focused on the
Queen, including religious lyric poetry
2. Petrarch; more or less the originator of the sonnet, in the Petrarchan scheme
3. Consistent iambic rhythm’s interruption signifies something
Analysis of sonnets
4. The Long Love That in My Thought Doth Harbor
1. Symbol of the warrior; metaphorically emerging from the forest causing the speaker’s
face to blush at the moment when he sees this lady; she’s embarrassed and the warrior
retreats
2. Task of becoming the perfect courteous lover, even without autonym over love itself;
reference to love as the master
1. Love as submission, or revolt?
5. They Flee from Me
1. Image of lovers as deer; formerly the author in control of the situation in the first
stanza; able to entice many
2. Second stanza recalls one particular encounter
3. Third stanza refers not only to this person’s fickle-ness, certain fashion of fickle-ness; we
realize that according to the first stanza, it’s her that stalks him
1. His concern about the fact that she and her fickleness have a place in the court
while he does not
2. Eroticism and love as currency rather than sincere personal expression
Sir Philip Sidney
6. Defense of Poesy
1. Sidney interested in Sappho, familiar with classical Greeks
7. Astrophil and Stella
1. Sidney appropriating metaphors of birth in order to solidify this idea
1. Process of creating the sonnet as giving birth
2. An authenticity-claim
2. Stella’s cruel, black eyes
1. Entice the lover into love, but also something different behind there
2. Sidney’s exploration of a contradiction; typical
3.
Shakespeare’s sonnets
8. Everything that grows
1. “Don’t have a baby, I’ll commemorate your beauty with a poem instead”
2. Anti-Petrarchan
1. The poem, not the beloved, is permanent and unchangin
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