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ENG202Y1- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 38 pages long!)


Department
English
Course Code
ENG202Y1
Professor
Carroll Balot
Study Guide
Final

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UTSG
ENG202Y1
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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ENG202 Introduction to English Literature
English Literary Periods
o Medieval (6th century to 1485 or 1304)
Dissolution of W. Rome leads to factional European states
Old English/Anglo-Saxon language followed by Old English
o Early Modern/Renaissance (1485-1660)
Elizabethan/end of the Tudor period followed by Jacobean
o Restoration (1660-1702)
English civil war and monarchic conflicts
o 18th century
Enlightenment: age of Reason (Augustan/Neoclassical art) followed by Age of
“esiility Age of Johso
o 19th century (Romantic era)
Early history and literature of Britain/Europe
o Up to the medieval era
Germanic invaders and others cause the collapse of W. Roman Empire
Outlying imperial provinces abandoned by Roman occupiers, incl. Britain
o Medieval period
Peaceful settling OR hostile takeover (?) of Germanic tribes in Celtic Britain
Monastic literary tradition in Latin encounters poetic tradition of
Germanics; written poems derived from oral traditions
King Alfred unsuccessfully attempts to standardize English across dialects,
commissions translations of certain works from Latin
Early English literary tradition in vernacular preserved in codices
Norman (French) conquest leads to upheaval of English culture and language
Theism: centrality of the divine in life, literature, etc.
Perfect life lived in imitation of the divine; history guided by divine
providence and the will of god
Work of the artist/scholar is discerning spiritual meaning
o Renaissance: Petrarch, Dante et al. assert continuity with classical lit
Following theism, Humanism: ultimate position of man within the world
The Dream of the Rood
o English poem from early centuries
o Rood: the rod, cross, crucifix
Ruthwell Cross: artifact containing lines from this poem
o Drea isio gere
Some roots in philosophical tradition
Rood author visited by divine entity in dream; specifically, the cross
o The cross itself talks about its own humiliation and glory
Christia relis edoed ith supernatural powers; divine vehicles
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ENG202 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in context
o Alliterative chivalric romance
Adheres to basic tropes and structure of chivalric romance
Not just fantasy; problems and themes explored by romance are very serious
Gawain: what is this story all about?
Author not known; from a monastic manuscript
“tes fo a ue of Gee Kight thologies
This the single surviving manuscript; from library of Robert Cotton, who
collected monastic manuscripts after Henry VIII catholic dissolution
Sermon-like form suggests author was clergy
o Oigis of the Athu legends
Refeed to i Jeffe of Moouth’s histo of Eglad
Later evolved into romantic Arthurian myth
Five romances written by Chretien de Troyes (a French poet); focused
o fie idiidual kights of Athu’s out
o Brief account of the English language
French became language of the court with Norman invasion
Eventually displaced by English in the court
Standardized nationwide around the time of Gawain
Beginning of Gawain; story of the fall of Troy and origin of Britain
o Atypical romantic beginning; embraces an epic atmosphere
o Brutus founding Britain, civilizing land of giants, etc.
Relationship with a mythic history of the country
o Account of the wonders of Britain; shift away from the epic toward romance
Only war in Arthurian tradition: war against Rome that established Arthur to the
throne (and eventual civil war that deposed him)
Arthur contrasts with warrior-like Brutus
o Emphasis on proper aristocratic behavior
Courtesy as well as bravery, combat ability, etc.
Acclaim for their courtesy is what draws the Green Knight to King
Athu’s out i the fist plae
The Gee Kight’s appeaae auses us suddenly to change our
perspective on the court
o Looks at the knights irreverently; comes with an axe and a holly
branch instead of weapons, confuses the knights
o G.K. is sophisticated, eloquent, well-gooed ad deoated…
o Refes to the as a gaggle, uestions who the king is in spite
of oiousess… deig the rules of conduct
Pookes the kight’s age
Laughableness of the knights affirmed when Gawain cuts the head off
and the Green Knight casually picks up his living head again
Gaai’s joue to fid the Green Knight
o Gaai’s petale
Represents sets of things in five
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