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HIS102Y1 Study Guide - Quiz Guide: Empress Dowager Cixi, Mao Zedong, History Of East Asia


Department
History
Course Code
HIS102Y1
Professor
Carry Takagaki
Study Guide
Quiz

Page:
of 2
University of Toronto
Department of History (2011-2012)
History 107Y1-Y: Approaches to Modern East Asian History
DECEMBER TERM TEST GUIDE
Date: Tuesday December 6, 2011
Time: 6:10 P.M.
Location: the term test will be held at the
Sandford Fleming Building, ROOM 3202
Length: 1 hour and 50 minutes
The test will consist of 3 parts.
The questions for this test are derived from material we covered in class starting with the Qing Dynasty (week 3, Tuesday
September 27, 2011) to the end of term, as well as from material covered in your tutorials. However, it is expected that you also know
general material that was covered in the first 2 lectures (e.g., Confucianism, the status of women, etc.) as much of that is relevant to subjects
discussed throughout the term.
When studying for the test concentrate on topics and themes that we covered in class and in the tutorials.
There will be no specific questions on material in the textbook that we did not cover in class or tutorials. However, this does not
mean that such material is not useful. EXAMPLE: in the lectures we did not discuss, law, crime, and punishment during the Qing Dynasty
(pp. 161-162 of Rhoads Murphey). Nevertheless, the textbook’s explanation of how Confucian concepts made the punishment of
disfiguration or dismemberment more shameful could help answer a question on Confucianism in pre-modern China.
Look at the number of marks each question is worth and allocate your time accordingly.
PART 1:
You will be asked to identify/define some terms/names (all the terms/names have been discussed in class or tutorials, are on the
Blackboard Lecture Outlines, and/or are in the textbook).
You will have a choice of terms/names
You should have distinct, separate points for full marks (e.g., what/who is it?; when was it?; why was it?; describe it).
Use point form at your own risk—if the marker cannot understand your point form style, or if your answer is too general, you may
lose marks.
EXAMPLE: if the term/name is ‘Mao Zedong,’ and you answer, “Communist, Long March, Great Leap Forward, Cultural
Revolution,” you probably mean, “he was a Communist, he took part in the Long March during which he became the leader of the CCP, he
instigated the Great Leap Forward as well as the Cultural Revolution.”
However, since you’re expecting the marker to interpret your answer, in effect this means that the marker has answered the
question for you. The marker could just as well interpret your answer as, “he was not a Communist, he had nothing to do with the Long
March, the Great Leap Forward, or the Cultural Revolution,” which is, of course, wrong, so you would get no marks for such a point form
answer.
How specific do you have to be? EXAMPLE: if the term/name is ‘Mao Zedong’, and you answer: “Chinese person, a man, smoked
cigarettes, lived a long time ago” –of course all this is true, but is this answer really worth any marks? Therefore, the more specific your
answer—when did he live (dates)? what did he do (specific events)? when did he do these things (specific dates)? why is he important?—
the better the mark.
PART 2
You will be asked to write an essay on imperial China. By ‘essay’ you are not expected to have a ‘thesis.’ You are only expected to
write a more extended answer than the identification questions.
You will have a choice of essay topics to answer.
Make sure you answer the question (i.e., you get no marks for material, no matter how insightful, that has nothing to do with the
question. So if you don’t have much to say about a particular question, don’t answer it; pick another one!!). Point form will not be
acceptable.
How specific do you have to be? As noted above, if the essay is about ‘Empress Dowager Cixi,’ and you answer: “Chinese person,
a woman, lived a long time ago, important in Chinese history” –of course all this is true, but is this answer really worth any marks?
Therefore, the more specific your answer (when did she live? what did she do? when did she do these things? why is she important?), the
better the mark.
How long should the essay be? There is no prescribed length to the essay. Look at the number of marks the essay is worth to
determine its relative worth with respect to the entire test, and try to write as complete an answer as possible.
PART 3
You will be asked to write an essay on some aspect of China after 1910. By ‘essay’ you are not expected to have a ‘thesis.’ You are
only expected to write a more extended answer than the identification questions.
Again, you will be given a choice of questions.
Make sure you answer the question (i.e., you get no marks for material, no matter how insightful, that has nothing to do with the
question. So if you don’t have much to say about a particular question, don’t answer it; pick another question!!). Point form will not be
acceptable.
How long should the essay be? There is no prescribed length to the essay. Look at the number of marks the essay is worth to
determine its relative worth with respect to the entire test, and try to write as complete an answer as possible.