ITA201H1- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 31 pages long!)

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ITA201H1
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
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ITA201 Major Italian Authors in Translation From Marino to Calvino
Tuesday September 12th, Lecture 1
Baroque:
Indicates the period of Literature and art between the second half of the 16th
century and the end of the 17th c.
Goes against Classicism, completely re-invented
The term baroque indicates the period, in literature and the arts, between the
second half of the 16th and the end of the 17th ct., although its boundaries vary
depending on different national traditions. It must be understood in relation to the
high Renaissance of the first half of the 16th ct.
If the great artists of the Renaissance had taken nature as their model, their
followers had turned their method into an artificial manner the second half of the
16th ct. is also referred to as Mannerism, a term sometimes used with negative
implications, but that perhaps more simply should be thought of as a re-orientation
of the relationship between art and its real world models.
Baroco: a particular kind of paradoxical syllogism
Barroco: a Portuguese word for an irregular kind of pearl
Natural Vs. Artificial
The natural is banal, the artificial is artistic because its creative
Baroque Introduced Techniques
-Trompl’oeil
-Du in Sutto
Some principles of the Baroque (from F. Guardiani, In Prospettiva, 1999)
True vs. False
If the function of art were that to imitate the world (mimesis), than it would be a
mere copy of the real. The artist should not copy the external appearance of the
world, but rather, like God, create a new world, which will be false by the criterion of
imitation, but will also be a true act of creation. Hence, the importance of illusion
such as trompe-l’oeil in painting.
Natural vs. Artificial
The natural is banal, the artificial is artistic because creative.
Surface vs. Depth
Baroque art focuses on and celebrates the formal aspects of the work of art (e.g.,
poetic rhythm and sounds in literature, dark and light in painting, complexity of
structure in architecture at the expense of content in other words, it privileges
how the work functions over what is is about. This also results in an emphasis on
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the sensuous aspect of the artistic experience, as its material dimension is carefully
cultivated.
Ecstasy of Saint Teresa
-Bernini, Santa Maris de la’Victoria
-Art as Theatre
-Erotic Mysticism
Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi
-Bernini
-Four marble giants representing the four rivers representing:
Nile, Rio De La Plata, the Danubias, Gange
-An imitation of an Egyptian obelisk
-Animals and plants of different kind emerging from water (eroticism) and depicted
with colors and golden varnish (attention to pictorial nature od sculpture, use of
many different materials)
High Renaissance
Mannerism:
Term sometimes used w/ negative implications, but should be thought as a re-
orientation of the relationship between art and the real world models.
Giovan Marino (1569-1625)
Born into a well-to-do family. His father was a lawyer, but instead of following in his
footsteps, Marino devoted himself to poetry and left home.
1588: member of the Accademia degli Svegliati
He is arrested twice, in 1598 and 1600, and spends some time in jail.
Travels throughout Italy, on his own and, after 1603, as secretary to Cardinal Pietro
Aldobrandini.
1602: publishes Le Rime in Venice.
1608-15: in Turin; in 1609 he is knighted by the Grand Duke of Piedmont. Shortly
thereafter a poetic rival, Gaspare Murtola, attempts to murder him.
1611: again in prison, accused of writing slanderous poems against the Grand Duke
1615-6: in Paris, invited by Maria de’ Medici
1620: La galleria and La Sampogna
1623: publishes L’Adone and returns to Italy, first in Rome than Naples.
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