Study Guides (248,044)
Canada (121,254)
Mathematics (559)
MAT135H1 (86)
all (48)

Graphing Related Questions

7 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Mathematics
Course
MAT135H1
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Summer

Description
Graphing  Related  Topics     Knowledge  Summary:     RULES  &  DEFINITIONS  TO  KEEP  IN  MIND:     Minimum  and  Maximum  Values:   1) f(x)  has  an  absolute  maximum  and  a  global  maximum  at  x=c  if  f(x)   <  f(c)  for  every  x  in   that  particular  domain     2) f(x)  has  a  relative  maximum  and  a  local  maximum  at  x=c  if  f(x)   <  f(c)  for  every  x  in  some   open  interval  around  x=c   3) f(x)  has  an  absolute  minimum  and  a  global  minimum  at  x=c  if  f(x)   >  f(c)  for  every  x  in   that  particular  domain   4) f(x)  has  a  relative  minimum  and  a  local  minimm  at  x=c  if  f(x)   >  f(c)  for  every  x  in  some   open  interval  around  x=c     Critical  Points:   We  say  that  x=c  is  a  critical  point  of  the  function  f(x)  if  f(c)  exists  and  if  either  of  the  following  are   true:  f’(c)=0  or  f’(c)  does  not  exist.    Note:  we   require  f(c)  to  exist  in  order  for  x=c  to  actually  be  a   critical  point.   Find  the  critical  numbers  by  obtaining  first  derivative  and  setting  function  to  0:       1.  Where  y’=0  or  does  not  exist       2.  Where  y’  changes  from  +  to   -­‐  there’s  a  local  max       3.  Where  y’  changes  from  -­‐  to  +  there’s  a  local  min     Absolute  Extrema:   Finding  absolute  extrema  of  f(x)  on  [a,b]   1. Verify  that  the  function  is  continuous  on  the  interval  [a,b].   2. Find  all  the  critical  points  of  f(x)  that  are  in  the  interval  [a,b].       3. Evaluate  the  function  at  the  critical  points  found  in  step  1  and  at  the  end  points   4. Identify  the  absolute  extrema     Fermat’s  Theorem:   If  f(x)  has  a  relative  extrema  at  x=c  and  f’(c)  exists  then  x=c  is  a  critical  point  of  f(x).    It  will  be  a   critical  point  such  that  f’(c)=0     Mean  Value  Theorem:   Suppose  that  f(x)  is  a  function  that  satisfies  both  of  the  following:   1. f(x)  is  continuous  on  the  closed  interval  [a,b]   2. f(x)  is  differentiable  on  the  open  interval  (a,b)   ▯ ▯ ▯ ▯▯(▯) Then  there’s  a  number  c  such  that  a  <  c    0  for  all  x  in  (a,  b),  then  f  is  increasing  on  [a,  b]   2. If  f  '(x)  <  0  for  all  x  in  (a,  b),  then  f  is  decreasing  on  [a,  b]   3. If  f  '(x)  =  0  for  all  x  in  (a,  b),  then  f  is  constant  on  [a,  b]     Concavity:   Let  f  be  a  function  whose  second  derivative  exists  on  an  open  interval  I.   1. If  f  ''(x)  >  0  for  all  x  in  I,  then  the  graph  of  f  is  concave  upward   2. If  f  ''(x)  <  0  for  all  x  in  I,  then  the  graph  of  f  is  concave  downward   3. If  f  ''(x)  =  0  for  all  x  in  I,  then  the  graph  of  f  is  a  line,  neither  concave  upward  or   downward     Inflection  Points:   Find  points  of  inflection  by   obtaining  f''(x),  setting  it  to  0,  and  solving  for  x.     Asymptotes:   For  horizontal  asymptotes  check  the  limit  as  x  approaches  infinity .    For  vertical  asymptotes  when   the  function  is  rational  set  the  denominator  equal  to  zero  and  solve .     First  Derivative  Test:   This  is  a  method  for  determining  whether  an  inflection  point  is  a  minimum,  a  maximum,  or  neither.     Suppose  that  x=c  is  a  critical  point  of  f(x)  then,   1. If  f’(x)  >  0  to  the  left  of  x=  c  and  f’(x)  <  0  to  the  right  of  x=  c,  then  x=  c  is  a  relative   maximum.   2. If  f’(x)  <  0  to  the  left  of  x=  c  and  f’(x)  >  0  to  the  right  of  x=  c,  then  x=  c  is  a  relative   minimum.   3. If  f’(x)  is  the  same  sign  on  both  sides  of  x=  c  then  x=  c  is  neither  a  relative  maximum  nor   a  relative  minimum.       Second  Derivative  Test:   The  second  derivative  test  relates  the  concepts  of  critical  points,  extreme  values,  and  concavity  to   give  a  very  useful  tool  for  determining  whether  a  critical  point  on  the  graph  of  a  function  is  a   relative  minimum  or  a  relative  maximum.    Suppose  that  x=  c  is  a  critical  point  of  f’(c)  such  that   f’(c)=0  and  that  f’’(x)  is  continuous  in  a  region  around  x=  c.    Then,   1. If  f’’(c)  <  0  then  x=  c  is  a  relative  maximum   2. If  f’’(c)  >  0  then  x=  c  is  a  relative  minimum   3. If  f’’(c)  =  0  then  x=  c  can  be  a  relative  maximum,  relative  minimum   or  neither     Examples:     Year:  2002   Question:  16   If  the  two  curves  y=  4lnx  and  y=  cx  (where  c  is  a  positive  constant)  have  exactly  one  point  in   common,  what  must  be  the  value  of  c?               y=  cx 2         P  (a,  b)                  1y=  4lnx               If  the  two  curves  have  exactly  one  point  in  common,  say  P  (a,  b),  then  the  two  curves  must  be   tangential  at  P.     y=  cx   y’=  2cx   y’  at  P=  2ca     ▯ ▯ Therefore:  2c
More Less

Related notes for MAT135H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit