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machi 1-4

8 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL200Y1
Professor
Janice Stein

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Morad Moazami
Machiavellis The Prince: Chapters 1 - 4
Chapter I: The Kinds of Principalities and the Means by
Which They Are Acquired:
The Different Kinds of States:
Machiavelli describes the different kinds of states, arguing that all states are
either republics or principalities.
Principalities can be divided into hereditary principalities and new
principalities.
oNew principalities are either completely new or new appendages to
existing states.
By fortune or strength, a prince can acquire a new principality with his own
army or with the arms of others.
Chapter II: Hereditary Principalities
Chapter II focuses on methods to govern and maintain principalities.
Maintaining Your Own State:
It is easier to govern a hereditary state than a new principality for two main
reasons.
oFirst, those under the rule of such states are familiar with the princes
family and are therefore accustomed to their rule.
The natural prince only has to keep past institutions intact,
while adapting these institutions to current events.
www.notesolution.com
oSecond, the natural disposition of subjects in a hereditary state is to
love the ruling family, unless the prince commits some horrible act
against his people.
Even if a strong outsider succeeds in conquering a princes
hereditary state, any setback the outsider encounters will allow
the prince to reconquering the state.
Chapter III: Mixed Principalities
Maintaining a Newly Acquired Principality:
Maintaining a new principality is more difficult than maintaining a
hereditary state.
oIn the first place, people will willingly trade one recently arrived ruler
for another, hoping that a new ruler will be better than the present
one.
This expectation of improvement will induce people to take up
arms against any relatively unestablished prince.
Although the people may quickly realize that their revolt
is ineffective, they will still create great disorder.
oFurthermore, when a prince takes over another princes domain, he
finds himself in a tricky situation with regard to the people who put
him in power.
He cannot maintain the support of these people because he
cannot fulfill all of their expectations that their situation will
improve.
But he also cannot deal too harshly with them because he is in
their debt. Immediately after taking power, the prince is in
danger of losing his newly gained principality.
www.notesolution.com
Morad Moazami
When a prince successfully suppresses a revolt, however, the ruler can easily
prevent further revolt by harshly punishing the rebels and decimating his
opposition.
oThe ruler can deal more harshly with his subjects in response to the
revolt than he would be able to normally.
It is much easier to maintain control over a new principality if the people
share the same language and customs as the princes own country.
If this is the case, the prince has to do only two things:
oDestroy the family of the former prince,
oMaintain the principalitys laws and taxes.
People will live quietly and peacefully so long as their old ways
of life are undisturbed.
New states that have different languages and customs from those of the
prince are more difficult to maintain.
One of the princes most effective options is to take up residence in the new
state.
oBy living there, the prince can address problems quickly and
efficiently.
oHe can prevent the local officials from plundering his territory. The
subjects will be in close contact with the prince.
Therefore, those who are inclined to be good will have more
reason to show their allegiance to the prince and those who are
inclined to be bad will have more reason to fear him. Invaders
will think twice before attempting to take over the state.
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Morad Moazami Machiavellis The Prince: Chapters 1 - 4 Chapter I: The Kinds of Principalities and the Means by Which They Are Acquired: The Different Kinds of States: Machiavelli describes the different kinds of states, arguing that all states are either republics or principalities. Principalities can be divided into hereditary principalities and new principalities. o New principalities are either completely new or new appendages to existing states. By fortune or strength, a prince can acquire a new principality with his own army or with the arms of others. Chapter II: Hereditary Principalities Chapter II focuses on methods to govern and maintain principalities. Maintaining Your Own State: It is easier to govern a hereditary state than a new principality for two main reasons. o First, those under the rule of such states are familiar with the princes family and are therefore accustomed to their rule. The natural prince only has to keep past institutions intact, while adapting these institutions to current events. www.notesolution.com
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