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Midterm

International Law and Norms + Midterm outline

3 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POL208Y1
Professor
John Haines

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International Law and Norms
1.Midterm exam focused on readings and lectures, stressed readings…
2.Everything on part 3 on the syllabus Jan 11th - Feb 8th
Structure of the lecture
3.Address the paradox of international law
4.The historical roots of international law
5.The different levels
6.Review the role of norms, there dynamics and political change
7.The paradox
8.For most realist scholars of international relations, anarchy, the lack of international
government remains the key feature of international life
9.State seems to take international law as they deem fit. They have a commitment to
an obligation but they can easily change that commitment, however, international
scene today is much more regulated then international scholars think.
10. International law is best understood as a core international institutions as a
set of rules, norms and practices created by state to achieve common goals and these
goals deal with issues such as international justice, order and human rights
11.The overall objective of international law is to achieve some sort of order
among states.
12.To achieve a minimum order, they have created international institutions.
International institutions can exist without any organizational structure, there
existence is based on norms, rules and principles that created them and makes them
functional
13.The historical roots
It all started in Europe from the 17th century onwards, the minimum objective was
to tame the state of anarchy
It was first a religious undertaking, so European rulers, Queens and Kings had the
legitimacy to rule because they received there authority from God
In such a city where authority is coming from a higher level (GOD), international
law started to develop as a sect from God, and these divine rules were imposed on the
rulers of Europe in the 16th and 17th century and something like a natural law
emerged.
The idea of using proportionate force was derived from Christian idea of just
punishment.
Even a setting where Gods authority was the first and last words, some crucial
institution started to appear among the Italian city states for the first time,
ambassadors were exchanged between the cities, the practice of exchanging
ambassadors started there and before that it was a very bizarre change because rulers
didnt trust each other. To make sure you will respect a peace treaty or even an
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Description
International Law and Norms 1. Midterm exam focused on readings and lectures, stressed readings 2. Everything on part 3 on the syllabus Jan 11th - Feb 8th Structure of the lecture 3. Address the paradox of international law 4. The historical roots of international law 5. The different levels 6. Review the role of norms, there dynamics and political change 7. The paradox 8. For most realist scholars of international relations, anarchy, the lack of international government remains the key feature of international life 9. State seems to take international law as they deem fit. They have a commitment to an obligation but they can easily change that commitment, however, international scene today is much more regulated then international scholars think. 10. International law is best understood as a core international institutions as a set of rules, norms and practices created by state to achieve common goals and these goals deal with issues such as international justice, order and human rights 11. The overall objective of international law is to achieve some sort of order among states. 12. To achieve a minimum order, they have created international institutions. International institutions can exist
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