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Study Notes on SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - date not accurate

6 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY100H1
Professor
Michael Inzlicht

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SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
HOW WE SEE OURSELVES
CONCEPT OF SELF: full store of knowledge about ME
SELF-AWARENESS sense of self as the object of awareness (I thinks
about ME)
SELF-SCHEMA cognitive aspect, integrated set of memories, beliefs
& generalizations about self
WORKING SELF-CONCEPT immediate experience of self
INDEPENDENT & INTERDEPENDENT SELF-CONSTRUALS do
you view yourself as fundamentally separate from or inherently
connected to others?
SELF-ESTEEM: evaluative aspect, often based on reflected appraisal, or
how they believe others view them/how others respond to them.
SOCIOMETER THEORY LEARY: Humans have an adaptive need to
belong self-esteem measures social acceptance/rejection
DEATH ANXIETY: self-esteem staves off anxiety of mortality, via
terror management theory
LIFE OUTCOMES: high self-esteem does not predict success. MAYBE
vice-versa
MENTAL STRATEGIES: we are better than average. We favouritize
anything associated with ME, we are unrealistically optimistic about our
futures.
SELF-EVALUATION:
people rate themselves by how relevant their performance is to their self-
concept & how they compare with significant people around them.
people exaggerate/publicize relationships with winners,
minimize/hide relationships with losers
OR, they feel better when reading about SUPERSTARS if
they feel that their status is attainable in the future
SOCIAL COMPARISONS:
evaluation of our actions abilities & beliefs by comparing them to those of
other people
oHigh self-esteem downward comparisons
www.notesolution.com
oLow self-esteem upward comparisons
SELF-SERVING BIASES:
Tendency to take credit for success & blame failure on outside factors
oHigh self-esteem self-serving biases, assume that criticism is
motivated by envy or prejudice
ATTITUDES GUIDE BEHAVIOUR:
SOCIALIZATION & EXPERIENCE
STRONG ATTITUDES
DISCREPANCIES DISSONANCE
oAttitude change: FESTINGER&CARLSMITH paid to say that
task was fun
oPostdecisional dissonance: focusing on positive aspects of a
choice one has made and on the negative aspects of the option
not chosen
oJustifying effort: as in HAZING justified by thinking man,
getting in here must be so awesome
PERSUASION: active, conscious effort to change attitudes by transmitting a
message
Elaboration Likelihood Model: theory that the CENTRAL ROUTE to
persuasion strong and enduring attitude changes
CREDIBILITY & PERSUASIVENESS DEPEND ON
Content: strong, logical arguments, ones that appeal to our emotions
Source: credible, attractive
Receiver
HOW WE SEE OTHERS
MAKING IMPRESSIONS: our impressions of others are affected by non-
verbal behaviours
FACIAL EXPRESSIONS: first things people notice
BODY LANGUAGE: people can make accurate judgements based on
only thin slices of behaviour (gait, tone of voice)
www.notesolution.com

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Description
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY HOW WE SEE OURSELVES CONCEPT OF SELF: full store of knowledge about ME SELF-AWARENESS sense of self as the object of awareness (I thinks about ME) SELF-SCHEMA cognitive aspect, integrated set of memories, beliefs & generalizations about self WORKING SELF-CONCEPT immediate experience of self INDEPENDENT & INTERDEPENDENT SELF-CONSTRUALS do you view yourself as fundamentally separate from or inherently connected to others? SELF-ESTEEM: evaluative aspect, often based on reflected appraisal, or how they believe others view themhow others respond to them. SOCIOMETER THEORY LEARY: Humans have an adaptive need to belong self-esteem measures social acceptancerejection DEATH ANXIETY: self-esteem staves off anxiety of mortality, via terror management theory LIFE OUTCOMES: high self-esteem does not predict success. MAYBE vice-versa MENTAL STRATEGIES: we are better than average. We favouritize anything associated with ME, we are unrealistically optimistic about our futures. SELF-EVALUATION: people rate themselves by how relevant their performance is to their self- concept & how they compare with significant people around them. people exaggeratepublicize relationships with winners, minimizehide relationships with losers OR, they feel better when reading about SUPERSTARS if they feel that their status is attainable in the future SOCIAL COMPARISONS: evaluation of our actions abilities & beliefs by comparing them to those of other people o High self-esteem downward comparisons www.notesolution.com
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