Study Guides (258,518)
CA (124,949)
UTSG (8,541)
PSY (738)
PSY100H1 (387)

ch 9_

1 Page
30 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY100H1
Professor
Michael Inzlicht

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full page of the document.
Motivation is the area that studies the factors that energize, or stimulate,
behavior.
Some of the most commonly motivated behaviors relate to immediate
biological survival (such as responding to hunger and thirst), as well as to
long-term social needs (such as affiliation and achievement).
A need is a state of deficiency, such as a lack of air or food. You need air and
food to survive. You also need other people. Failure to satisfy the need leads to
psychosocial or physical impairment.
Drives are psychological states activated to satisfy needs. Needs create
arousal, which motivates behaviors that will satisfy our needs.
When an animal is deprived of some need (such as water, sleep or sex) a
specific drive increases in proportion to the amount of deprivation. The drive
state creates arousal, which activates behaviors until performing one of them
reduces the drive.
If a behavior consistently reduces a drive, it becomes a habit; the likelihood
that a behavior will occur is due to both drive and habit.
The Yerkes-Dodson law dictates that performance increases with arousal,
thus creating a shape like an inverted U. Thus, you perform best on exams
when you have a moderate level of anxiety.
Freud believed that drives are satisfied according to the pleasure principle,
which tells organisms to seek pleasure and avoid pain.
Extrinsic motivation emphasizes the external goals toward which an
activity is directed, such as drive reduction or reward. For example, working
to earn a paycheck.
Intrinsic motivation refers to the value or pleasure that is associated with
an activity but has no biological goal or purpose. For example, listening to
music. They are performed for their own sake.
The need to belong theory states that the need for interpersonal
attachments is a fundamental motive that has evolved for adaptive purposes.
This theory is supported by evidence that people feel anxious when excluded
from their social groups. According to social exclusion theory, anxiety warns
individuals that they may be facing rejection from their group.
The process of transcending immediate temptations in order to achieve long-
term goals is known as delay of gratification.
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Motivation is the area that studies the factors that energize, or stimulate, behavior. Some of the most commonly motivated behaviors relate to immediate biological survival (such as responding to hunger and thirst), as well as to long-term social needs (such as affiliation and achievement). A need is a state of deficiency, such as a lack of air or food. You need air and food to survive. You also need other people. Failure to satisfy the need leads to psychosocial or physical impairment. Drives are psychological states activated to satisfy needs. Needs create arousal, which motivates behaviors that will satisfy our needs. When an animal is deprived of some need (such as water, sleep or sex) a specific drive increases in proportion to the amount of deprivation. The drive state creates arousal, which activates behaviors until performing one of them reduces the drive. If a behavior consistently reduces a drive, it becomes a habit; the likelihood that a behavior will occur is due to both drive and habit. The Yerkes-Dodson law dictates that performance increases with arousal, thus creating a shape like an inver
More Less
Unlock Document


Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit