Study Guides (380,000)
CA (150,000)
UTSG (10,000)
SMC (90)
Final

SMC219Y1 Study Guide - Final Guide: Abjection, Opentext, Intertextuality


Department
St. Michael's College Courses
Course Code
SMC219Y1
Professor
Ted Petit
Study Guide
Final

Page:
of 2
Chapter 11: Erotic Analysis
Media Erotics Explores the array of resistive pleasures that audiences derive from media by examining the
various sensuous, creative, and transgressive ways in which persons use and interpret media
Eros --> Erotics
(Transgression +
Production)
Greek god of primordial lust, sublimated impulses, creative urges and fertility.
The word “Erotics” comes from this god. Like the god, erotics has two pricinple
dimensions:
1. Prohibition, taboo and regression (repressed desire)
2. Production, expenditure, and dissemination (seminal fluids)
Thus, eroticism is disruptive (of the status quo or order) and productive (of something new)
This is also why Eros was aka the epithet Eleutherios  ‘the liberator
Types of Pleasure
Dominant
(hegemonic)
Pleasure passive consumption of media – its messages and models of identity - by audiences
The Gaze Visual pleasure from being scopophilia – objectification and voyeuristic desires.
Form, genre &
narrative
Dramatic pleasures, as desires are created and satisfied by form, genre & narrative.
Resistive
(counter-
hegemonic)
These pleasures arise from the active production of meaning and modes of being by
audiences.
Interpretive Play An improvisational mode of reading that ignores dominant interpretive codes in favor of
pursuing immediate bodily desires.
Fandom &
Cultural Production
Fandom – organized communities or subcultures comprised of persons who share a
special affinity for or attachment to a media text, which they, in turn, express through their
participation in communal practices (fan fiction) and events (conventions)
Cultural Production – generation of semiotic, enunciative, and textual materials related to
a specific media artifact.
Participatory Media Those communication technologies that necessitate either direct-user interaction (DUI), or
user-created content (UCC) to function.
Cultural Resistance
Resistance is…
Those symbolic and material practices that challenges, subvert, or suspend the cultural
codes, rules, or norms, which through everyday operation create, sustain, and naturalize
the prevailing social structure in a particular space and time.
Contextual Resistance is always specific to particular times, places and social relationships
Tactical Tactics are maneuvers within the enemy’s field of vision – resistance is an action or
practice, which seizes propitious moments - turning events into opportunities, and exploits
cracks in the system.
Creative Resistance adjusts and amends the existing social order without overturning it.
Cumulative Multiple acts of resistance over time have potential to accumulate, and can bring about
more permanent change.
Incremental Resistance remakes society gradually and subtly, and is often unconscious since we are
frequently motivated by personal benefits or desires
Interpretive Play
The P/M/I Model
(4 Quadrants)
Pleasure, Meaning, Identity Model
Quadrant I: Passive audience consumes closed text (strong plaisir, reproduces doxa)
Quadrant II: Passive consumption of open text (weak jouissance, confusion or boredom)
Quadrant III: Active engagement of closed text (weak plaisir, rejects/overturns structure)
Quadrant IV: Active engagement of open text (strong jouissance, transgressive pleasure)
Types of Texts
Closed (Readerly) Aims at eliciting a sort of obedient cooperation
Open (Writerly) Calls for cooperation of reader, and wants the reader to make a series of interpretive choices.
Types of Reading
Passive (Consumer) A vessel waiting to be filled with meaning,
(e.g. watching TV following strict program schedule)
Active (Producer) A bricoleur who invents their own meaning out of the raw semiotic materials found in texts
(e.g. watching TV, channel-surfing, producing their own experience)
Types of Pleasure French has two words for pleasure.
Plaisir Describes a comfortable and comforting pleasure: one that conforms to the ‘dominant
ideology and the subjectivity it proposes.’
Jouissance An ecstatic pleasure that involves disruption of and momentary release from the social
order; a temporary breakdown of subjectivity and thus an evasion of ideology.
Textual Cruising Practice of reading with one’s body
Abjection What disturbs identity, system, order. What doesn’t respect borders, positions, & rules.
Carnivalesque
(grotesque realism)
Describes the ritual spectacles, comic verbal compositions, and billingsgate typical of the
culture of folk humor seen at popular festivals/feasts in the Middle Ages. Central to this
term is grotesque realism: concerns degradation, debasement, or uncrowning; social
inversion. (i.e. South Park uncrowns celebrities and adults, and children are superior)
Intertextuality The idea that texts refer to other texts.
Irony Refers to an attitude or sensibility than to the well-known literary device in which the
author means the opposite of what is explicitly said.
Liminality Concerns occupying, imploding or dissolving borders and boundaries
Depthlessness The development and spread of the new information technologies has given way to a
culture of surface and spectacle. Culture of depthlessness is more about sensuous surfaces
and less about underlying structures. (i.e. wearing Family Guy shirt = resistive pleasure)
Fandom and
Cultural Production
Fandom Organized communities or subcultures comprised of persons who share a special affinity
for or attachment to a media text, which they, in turn, express through their participation in
communal practices (fan fiction) and events (conventions)
Fan Stereotypes Derided by the media and non-fans as fanatics, obsessive nut jobs, and just plain weird.
Cultural Production Generation of semiotic, enunciative, and textual materials related to a specific media
artifact.
Semiotic Productivity The way fans use the semiotic (symbolic) resources in media texts to enhance the
meaningfulness in their everyday lives. It is primarily internal and personalized.
Enunciative
Productivity
Public and communal, fans engage in communication rituals or practices. Like exegesis,
careful attention to and hyper-detailed analysis of characters, themes and plot developments.
Textual Productivity Refers to the vast array of artistic, literary, educational, and entertaining cultural products
that fans create. (Games, character bios, episode guides, artwork, short films etc.)
Participatory Media Those communication technologies that necessitate either direct-user interaction (DUI), or
user-created content (UCC) to function.
Direct User
Interaction
DUI (e.g. Video Games) – require direct and frequent inputs from users.
Control One must feel that one has sufficiently control to obtain an objective, but never so much
control that the activity stops being challenging. The balance between too easy and too
difficult is known as flow, and it produces heightened states of enjoyment.
Immersion We often evince a desire to escape from the ‘real’ world into a land of pure wish fulfillment
Described as being ‘in the zone’
Performance Being able to experiment with unfamiliar subjectivities and expressing actual desires and
aspects of themselves that may not be accepted or acceptable in everyday life. The pleasure
of performance lies in its inventive, creative, and productive character.
User-Created
Content
(blogs)
UCC – the material must be published in some context that is publically available,
demonstrate creative effort, and be created outside of professional practices.
Issue-Oriented Bloggers draw their authority from their own personal, subjective experience with issues.
They often tell stories using language that relates to and resonates with their audience.
Personal Diary Tend to be about the person who writes the blogs, in some cases, promoting one’s own
artistic and creative abilities.
Play vs. Work Play involves a stepping out of real life for the joy of play itself, while work is on the other
end. Time becomes a commodity in the capitalist system and play ‘wastes’ this time. In fact,
it is ‘office stealing’ (office supplies, wasting time, personal copies on copy machine)
Subverting
Resources
Using the resources of work for play. (E.g. office stealing, illegally downloading music)