Study Guides (248,151)
Canada (121,346)
Geography (617)

Chapter 3 spatial.docx

3 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2122A/B
Professor
Micha Pazner
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3: Map Projections A map projection is a geometrical transformation of the earth’s spherical or ellipsoidal surface onto a flat map  surface. Globes versus Flat Maps Of all maps, globes give us the most realistic picture of the earth as a whole. It’s realistic because basic  geometric properties such as distance, direction, shape and areas are preserved because the globe is same  scale everywhere but as everything do, globes has disadvantages. They don’t let you view all parts of the  earth’s surface at the same time. Also, they aren’t useful to see kind of detail you might find on the road  map in your car. Globes are also bulky and they’re hard to store and handle. Globe construction is also  very laborious and costly. It would be very nice if we can map the earth without any distortion. Unfortunately, the spherical earth is  not a developable surface. So, all flat maps are distorted. However, what cartographers do is to  minimize these distortions or preserve a particular geometrical property at the expense of others. This is  also known as map projection problem. The Map Projection Process The first step is to define the earth’s irregular surface topography as elevations above or sea depths  below a more regular surface known as geoid. The second step is to project slightly undulating geoid onto the more regular oblate ellipsoid surface. The third step involves projecting the ellipsoidal or spherical surface onto a plane through the use of  map projection equations that transform geographic or spherical coordinates into planar (x,y) map  coordinates. The greatest distortion of the earth’s surface geometry occurs in this step. Map Projection Properties Scale Because of the stretching and shrinking that occurs in the process of transforming the spherical  or ellipsoidal earth surface to a plane, the stated map scale is true only at selected points or along  particular lines called points and lines of tangency. Everywhere else the scale of the flat map is  actually smaller or larger than the stated scale. There are in fact two map scales. Actual scale is the scale that you measure at any point on the  map; it will differ from one location to another. Principle scale is the scale of the generating  globe—a globe reduced to the scale of the desired flat map. Scale factor is actual scale divided by principal scale. An SF of 2.0 on a small­scale map means  that the actual scale is twice as large as the principal scale. Completeness Completeness refers to the ability of map projections to show the entire earth. Correspondence relations You might expect that each point on the earth would correspond to a point on the map projection.  Such a point­to­point correspondence would grasp your attention from a feature on the earth to  the same feature on the map. Continuity To represent an entire spherical surface on a plane, the continuous spherical surface must be  interrup
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2122A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit