Study Guides (248,351)
Canada (121,501)
Geography (617)

Chapter 6 spatial.docx

4 Pages
75 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2122A/B
Professor
Micha Pazner
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 6: Relief Portrayal The terrain surface provides the foundation upon which we play out our lives. Nothing in the environment is  immune from the vertical differences on the earth’s surface that we call relief. In mapping, a terrain surface is a three­dimensional representation of data about the elevations of our physical  environment, and cartographers use relief portrayal to map those data. Planimetric maps are useful when the mapped area is essentially flat or when facts about an area’s relief aren’t  important to your needs. So, these kinds of maps ignore relief. However, if relief information is important, it’s best to look at topographic and other maps that show the three­ dimensional nature of the terrain surface. There are 2 ways of relief portrayal; absolute relief mapping, and relative relief mapping. Absolute Relief Mapping Methods Absolute relief is the actual elevation values at locations in the landscape. Absolute relief methods  provide the numerical elevation and water depth information. Spot elevations, benchmarks, and soundings On topographic maps, engineering plans, and/or aeronautical charts, the elevation of the surface  is given numerically at individual survey points. These elevation values, relative to the mean sea  level are called spot elevations. Searching for survey marks, or benchmarks at road intersections or forks are much easier than  at changeable location such as stream merging. Water depth readings are called soundings. For thousands of years, mariners used lead lines to  measure depth but now we have electronic depth measuring instruments. Sounding values are not  relative to mean sea level but they’re relative to specific definitions of low water.  Contours Contours are lines of equal elevation above a datum. It’s common to use contours in topographic  maps to show variations in relief. The vertical distance between contours are called the contour  interval. Isobaths Isobaths, also called depth contours or depth curves, are lines of equal water depth below the  mean sea level. They’re found on nautical charts.  Hypsometric tinting Hypsometric tinting (also called hypsometric  coloring) is a method of “coloring between  contour lines” that enhances the relative relief cues for contours while maintaining the absolute  portrayal of relief. Some isobaths have a stepped appearance much like a layer cake. This is because the space  between contours is given a distinct gray tone or color, called a discrete hypsometric. With newer technologies, the abrupt change between hypsometric tints can be minimized by  gradually merging one tint into the next, giving a smooth appearance to tonal gradation and this  is called continuous hypsometric tinting.  Relative Relief Mapping Methods In our daily lives, we’re usually concerned with the local range between high and low heights, or the  relative relief, rather than the absolute elevation values. Planimetric perspective maps These maps represent only the horizontal positions of features and not the vertical positions that  topographic maps show. Planimetric perspective maps give an overhead view of the mapped  area. Raised relief globes: Since globes present the truest picture of the earth as a whole, raised relief  globes provide the most realistic and useful portrayal of the vertical dimension. However there is  a flaw, when we reduce the size of earth to a bowling ball, earth would be smoother than the ball.  That’s why we use vertical exaggeration, which happens when the vertical scale is larger than the  horizontal scale. Relief models: We can also minimize the problem of high vertical distortion by using physical  relief models rather than globes. Relief models are constructed to show the curvature of the  earth. Raised relief topographic maps: It’s made by taking a flat topographic map, printing on a sheet  of plastic, and using heat to vacuum­form it into a three­dimensional model. But they also have  flaws because of their shortcoming such as; cost more, difficult to store and displacement of  features is also common. Hachures: This was common on nineteenth century small­scale maps and they look like  caterpillars crawling across the map. They were trying to show the terrain with a really basic and  simplistic approach. Relief shading: Relief shading has been used on maps since the late nineteenth century to  enhance the three­dimensional appearance of terrain features. The principle unde
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2122A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit