Study Guides (248,499)
Canada (121,594)
Geography (620)

Chapter 7 spatial.docx

3 Pages
119 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2122A/B
Professor
Micha Pazner
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 7: Qualitative Thematic Maps Thematic maps emphasize a single theme or a few related themes. Basic geographical reference information  will appear on a thematic map but the theme will stand out visually as the most important message of the map. Thematic maps can show both qualitative and quantitative information. In chapter 8, we’ll see the methods  mapmakers use to portray quantitative information (information that portrays a magnitude message) such as  population density, annual rainfall. In this chapter, we’ll see the ways mapmakers how qualitative information, or data that have classes varying in  type but not quantity. Examples include land cover, zoning, and soils. Multivariate maps show the geographical relationships between two or more themes. Dynamic qualitative  thematic maps focus on changes in feature locations and attributes over time. Qualitative Information Qualitative information tells you only what different things exist—lakes, rivers, roads, cities etc.  Quantitative information consists of data giving you the magnitudes of things, such as how large,  wide, fast, or high they are. A measurement level is a classification used to describe the nature of numerical info about features.  Nominal level information tells you simply which category (class) a feature belongs to. In GIS,  attributes carry the descriptive info for the geographic features. Point feature information Point feature is anything on the map, which is not a line feature, such as a small hill. Data collection for point feature information: Point data are collected through image  interpretation using photographic and digital images, such as air photos or satellite images, to  identify objects and their attributes. Line­feature information Line­feature is anything on the map, which can be followed, such as a path, stream or wall. Data collection for line feature information: Like point feature data, line feature info is  commonly collected through a variety of methods, including surveys, field observation and  image interpretation.  Area feature information Mapmakers commonly use two­dimensional area features to divide a region into areas that have  some common qualitative attribute. The idea here is that qualitative features within a category  share some common traits, while differing significantly from the other categories. Data collection for area feature information: Area feature data collected by ground survey, image  interpretation, or other methods such as census taking to determine the category for each data  collection area. Homogeneity Homogeneous means uniform in structure or composition throughout. For instance, a stand of trees  might prove to be entirely of the same species. The stand is a completely homogeneous qualitative area  feature since all of its defining objects (trees) are of the same 
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2122A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit