Study Guides (248,490)
Canada (121,589)
Geography (620)

Chapter 13 spatial.docx

3 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
Geography 2122A/B
Professor
Micha Pazner
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 12: Direction finding and compasses Direction by definition can only be determined with reference to something. This reference point, whether it is  some object or some known position, establishes a reference line, sometimes called a baseline, between you  and it. So, direction is measured relative to this reference line. In its simplest form, direction is determined egocentrically, that is, it’s self­centered. Imagine a line pointing  out from the front of your body. You go left or right, and you say it according to that. If you want to know the  direction to a distance object, the line from you to that object is called the direction line and you are at the  centre of symbolic clock face 12:00. Geographical Direction Systems Direction finding ability improves exponentially when you learn to think geocentrically in terms of a  geographical direction system. In this geographical direction system, as with the clock face, direction is  measured in angular units of circle with north at the top. North is 12:00 basically. True North True (or geographical) north is a fixed location on the earth—the north pole of the axis of earth  rotation. A great circle line from any point on earth to the north pole—that is, a meridian—is  known as a true north reference line. So, any meridian can serve as your reference line in  finding true north.  It’s valuable to mapmakers and GPS users. The advantage of using true north to reference direction is that you can find it without using any  special instruments. One of the oldest and most reliable ways to find true north is to locate the  North Star (Polaris). It’s positioned in the northern hemisphere sky less than one degree away  from the north celestial pole. You can use sun to find the true north. The first step is to find and object that casts a well­defined  shadow on level ground. Next, mark the spot at which the top of the shadow touches the ground.   After waiting 30 minutes or so, mark the spot at which the tip of the shadow. A line drawn  between your two marks is a true east­west line. Since sun rises in the east and sets in the west,  the shadow travels from west to east. So, your first marking will be the west and second will be  the east. So, with east to your right and west to your left draw a perpendicular line, and top of the  line is your true north. You can use a watch to find the true north as well. Simply hold the watch horizontally at eye  level, and then turn the watch until the hour hand points to the sun. Now picture a spot on the  dial halfway between the hour hand and 12:00. So, that line is true south and the opposite is the  true north. Grid North Grid north is the northerly or zero direction indicated by the datum of the grid used on the map.  It’s purely artificial, established for the convenience of those who use maps to measure or  compute directions. Universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid system is a standardized  system in which the line of constant easting running from top to bottom is oriented to grid north.  Magnetic North This
More Less

Related notes for Geography 2122A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit