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Health Sciences 1001A/B- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 53 pages long!)


Department
Health Sciences
Course Code
HS 1001A/B
Professor
Shauna Burke
Study Guide
Final

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Western
Health Sciences 1001A/B
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Health Science Chapter One Taking Charge of Your Health
What Is Health
Health tpiall refers to the oerall oditio of a perso’s od or id ad to the presee
or absence of an illness or injury
- Health is’t just a goal, ut a resoure to help us achieve our goals
- Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well being, not merely the
absence of disease of sickness
Wellness is a relatively new concept that expands our idea of health. Beyond the simple
presence or absence of disease, wellness refers to optimal health and vitality
- The ability to live life fully, with liveliness and meaning
- Largely determined by the decisions you make about how you live your everyday life
- Health and wellness are constantly working interchangeably and evolving
- Encompasses the 7 dimensions
Health Promotion A process of enabling people to increase control over and improve their
health
The Seven Dimensions of Wellness
1. Physical Wellness
- Requires healthy eating, exercise, learning about disease, getting regular check-ups …
etc.
- Influences quality of life* and how many years you will live
- *Healthy-Related Quality of Life a personal sense of physical and mental health.
Requires a full range of functional capacity to enable people to work, play, and maintain
satisfying relationships
2. Interpersonal/Social Wellness
- Involves learning effective communication skills, developing the capacity for intimacy,
and cultivating a support network
- Requires participating in and contributing to your community, country and world
3. Mental/Intellectual Wellness
- Includes an openness to new ideas, a capacity to think critically, and to learn new skills
- The ability to process and use information is one of the most important aspects of
wellness
4. Occupational Wellness
- A sense of personal satisfaction derived from career development how happy you are
in your occupation
- Involves attaining a work-life balance, it has a large influence on your overall wellness
5. Emotional Wellness
- Includes optimism, trust, self esteem, self control, and an ability to share feelings
- Requires monitoring feelings, identifying obstacles to emotional well being, and finding
solutions to emotional problems
- Most closely related to your feelings
6. Environmental Wellness
- Personal health depends on the health of the planet (violence, pollution)
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- Requires learning about and protecting yourself against such hazards
- Also involves taking action doing what you can do to decrease or eliminate hazards
7. Spiritual Wellness
- Includes having a set of guiding beliefs, principles or values that give meaning and
purpose to oe’s life
- Selfless concern for the well being of others, including hope and optimism
- Involves the capacity for love, compassion, forgiveness, joy, altruism, and fulfillment
- A resource for decreasing personal stress
- Some health professionals believe it is the core of wellness
Infectious vs. Chronic Diseases
Infectious Disease A disease that can spread from a person to person; caused by
microorganisms, such as bacteria and viruses
- Communicable from one person to another (Tuberculosis, influenza, common colds,
HIV/AIDS)
- Life expectancy has increased largely because of the development of vaccines and
antibiotics to fight infections. Also because of public health measures to improve living
conditions
Chronic Disease A disease that develops and becomes worse over a long period of time, such
as heart disease, cancer, or stroke
- People make choices every day that increase or decrease their risks for such diseases
- The best course of action is prevention
- Individuals have some control over whether they develop certain chronic diseases
Lifestyle Choices A osious ehaiour that a irease or derease a perso’s risk of
disease or injury; such behaviours include eating a healthy diet, smoking, exercising and others
Life Expectancy and Major Health Threats in Canada
- In the early-to-id 9’s, the aerage life expectancy in Canada was 58.8 years (M),
and 60.6 years (F)
- Health threats included infectious diseases. Because there were more people there was
a large spread of infectious diseases, also a lack of knowledge of the disease
- There was a lack of lea ater, poor seage, usaitar food preparatio … et.
- Growing trade between countries moved diseases from one place to another
- The sources of infectious diseases were soon discovered, and it became easier to
control the widespread of disease, with public health becoming more important
- The adoption of vaccinations and the development of antibiotics allowed the control of
major causes of morbidity (illness, disease) and mortality (death)
- In 2007-2009, the average life expectancy in Canada was 78.8 years (M), and 83.3 years
(F), with an average of 81.1 years
- Today, our major health threats are chronic diseases
- Life expectancy in Canada is among the highest in the world
- Life expectancy seems to rise as; more people are working, more people are educated,
and there are high concentrations of immigrants
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