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Health Sciences 1001A/B- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 24 pages long!)


Department
Health Sciences
Course Code
HS 1001A/B
Professor
Shauna Burke
Study Guide
Final

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Western
Health Sciences 1001A/B
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Chapter 1 - Taking Charge of Your Health
Reading:
1) Core Concepts in Health, pp. 2-39 2) Belluz, J. (2012).
2) Good science vs. bad science. Macleans.ca (http://www.macleans.ca/uncategorized/ good-science-
vs-bad-science/)
HEALTH DOES NOT EQUAL FITNESS
Healthy living will require effort. It is a conscious decision to adapt and change small behaviors in your life.
Health living should not inhibit your life and make it more difficult, it should gel with your already existing
life
Health = Overall condition of a perso’s od/id ad to the presee or asee of health/ijur.
Normally a result of factors we have no control over
Wellness = Optimal health and vitality in terms of spiritual, physical and mental. Viewed as the result of the
decisions we make and therefore we have control over it
7 Dimensions of Health and Wellness
1. Physical
o Requires healthy eating, exercise and regular checkups. Influences your quality of life and life
expectancy
o Health related quality of life = A personal sense of physical and mental health. Requires a full
range of functional capacity to enable people to work, play and maintain relationships
o In order to achieve optimal physical wellness you need to make decisions that will avoid illness
and injury
2. Interpersonal/ Social
o Developing the capacity for intimacy and creating a social support network
o Involved learning and effective communication skills.
o Requires participation in community, country, work, etc.
3. Intellectual
o Openness to new ideas and the capacity to think critically and learn new things
o The ability to process and use information
o Never stop learning; seek out new experiences and love challenges
4. Occupational
o A sense of personal satisfaction derived from your career. Work/ life balance is important
5. Emotional
o Includes optimism, trust, self-esteem and the ability to communicate feelings. Most closely
related to your own feelings
o Requires monitoring feelings, identifying obstacles and solving problems
o Ability to understand and deal with your emotions
6. Environmental
o The idea that personal health and wellness can depend upon environmental factors as well such
as violence, toxin pollution, sound pollution
o Requires learning about hazards and how to protect yourself against them as well as taking
action to fix the issues
7. Spiritual
o Havig a set of eliefs ad priiples that gie eaig to oe’s life. Does ot hae to e religio.
o Involves capacity for love, forgiveness, compassion, joy, etc.
o Focuses on the positive aspects of life and using spirituality as an antidote for negative emotions
Infectious disease= has to be able to be transmitted from one person to another (influenza, HIV/AIDS,
SARS, Ebola, the common cold)
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Chroi disease = ted to deelop ad eoe orse oer a period of tie, a’t e passed o to others,
sometimes caused by lifestyle factors (cancer, heart issues, strokes)
Life expectancy is 59 years for men, 61 years for women back in the day
78 for men 83 for women today
Morbidity relates to illness or disease whereas mortality relates to death
The best course of action for chronic disease is prevention; it is important that we are aware of the risk
factor related to individual health that individuals can change about their life but it is also important to
make sure to delicately balance this so as to not victim blame
Integrated Pan- Canadian Health Living Strategy (2002)
o Vision is a healthy nation in which all Canadians experience the conditions that support the
attainment of good health by reducing health disparities by 2015
o The goal is to decrease chronic diseases by addressing risk factors and societal conditions that
contribute to these diseases
o Population health approach!
o Canadian government lost 80 billion dollars annually based on chronic illness and death
o The goals:
- Increase by 20% the proportions that make healthy food choices
- Increase by 20% the proportions of Canadians that participate in physical activity
- Increase by 20% the proportions of Canadians at a healthy body weight based on a BMI of 18.5
to 24.9
Some people have a genetic predisposition for developing certain health problems, which can be a
result of a combination of factors such as biology, culture, environment, etc.
o You run into the danger of stereotyping or overgeneralizing when talking about health issues in a
diverse population. It is important to realize that every individual is unique and has unique
experiences with health
Health Related Differences
Sex/Gender
Gender is in your head, sex is between your legs. Men and women experience different
characteristics that affect wellness such as men have higher rates of smoking and drinking whereas
women have lower rates of pay. More than 70% of men have not seen a doctor for a checkup in the past
year.
Ethnicity
“oe diseases a e oetrated i ertai ethi groups’ gee pools. Ethi groups
tend to vary in their diets and different groups have different outlooks on substances such as alcohol,
tobacco, etc. Serious health challenges tend to affect First Nations and Aboriginal people more than
non- native people with about 1.5x the rate of heart disease, 3 -5x the rate of type 2 diabetes and 8-10x
the rate of infection from TB.
Income and Education Groups within the highest poverty rates and least education brackets have the
worst health status and are more likely to have bad diets, be overweight and have high rates of infant
mortality, HIV, diabetes and various other cancers and diseases. Poor people in wealthy neighborhoods
had higher mortality rates than poor people in low-income neighborhoods.
Disability
About 1 in 7 people in Canada have a form of a disability. People with disabilities are more
likely to be inactive and overweight.
Geographic Location
People living in rural areas have a higher death rate and are less likely to be
physically active than people living in urban areas
Sexual Orientation
People of different sexual orientations tend to experience more social pressure
and are therefore more likely to engage in risky behaviors. Additionally, HIV is a major concern for gay
men.
Good Science vs. Bad Science Julia Belluz
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