Ve-Lecture 2.docx

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Department
Kinesiology
Course
Kinesiology 2230A/B
Professor
Glen Belfry
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 2 Birds - Takes huge amount of energy and O2 to start flying - Higher up in the sky, less atmospheric pressure - Into the lung via air sacs, out via the windpipe o Allows for near constant, one-way air flow through their lungs - Fresh never mixes with stale air - Every flap of wings, air moves in and out - Inhale, lungs fill up, exhale, air sacs get pushed forward - Air posterior first then anterior therefore always have fresh air in lungs - Maintains good partial pressure Compostion of Air - Nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide - N2 is most abundant - Very little Ar and CO2 - As altitude increases, partial/barometric pressure decreases - Gravity attracts gases Gas Pressures and Exchange - Gas diffuse from high to low pressure - Total pressure = sum of partial pressures (Dalton’s Law) - 79% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.03% CO2 - If barometric pressure = 760mmHg o PO2= 760mmHg x 20.93% = 159 mmHg  Sea level (changes with weather)  % becomes .2093 o PCO2 = 760 x .0003 = .23 mmHg o PN2 = 760 x .7904 = 600 mmHg - Henry’s Law: gases dissolving in liquid are in proportion to PP’s Pressures - At the end of inspiration o Chest wall: contained, as it expands volume increases, pressure decreases o Pressure gradient moves things in between gas in alveoli and drives O2 into lungs - At end of expiration o Pressure in intrapleural space will be increasing meaning space will be reduced o Pressure gradient still present due to elasticity of chest wall, still wants to contract - If negative p
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