Study Guides (400,000)
CA (160,000)
Western (10,000)
1020E (200)
Study Guide

[Political Science 1020E] - Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (100 pages long!)


Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Charles Jones
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 100 pages of the document.
Western
Political Science 1020E
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Define the State
Make sense of the Dualism of the state
Chart changes in the state since its emergence in history
Determine why the state acts and what we should let states do for us
Lecture Plan:
States haven't always existed as there were competitions
Rival Forms: Cities, Traditional Kingdoms, Empires
State model proved superior after 1500
State Model is now universal throughout the globe
States are defined by territorial borders
It is possible where states may not exist
Will we ever move to other alternatives to states?
Will we always have states?
The State:
Caring, support
Family: "Particular Altruism" - tight interconnectedness with particular individuals not
generalized
It identifies a sphere of association (e.x. joining a club)
Move from particularism to universalism
Civil society: "Universal Egoism"
It is universal because when we relate to the state, the state deals with us
generally
State: "Universal Altruism"
Development:
State as End of History
Hegelian Idealism: (Idealism) Moving forward of history of human mind, human consciousness
His understanding of the state came from Hegel
Woodrow Wilson: State Idealist (American President, political scientist)
Defining the State 1:
Functionalism: You get what you need
State as provider of order and stability
Marxists: Class conflict - State resolves it
So, What threatens order?
But - State is whatever does this work
Defining the State 2:
Bureaucracy, Military, Police, Courts, etc.
i.
State as specific set of institutions:
1.
Why Treat these collectively as "the state"?
2.
After Hegel, Political Scientists rejected the concept as abstract , unnecessary
3.
Organizational Approach:
Territorial - Demarcated area, defensible borders (demarcated - identifying a specific area)
1.
People - Community defined by territorial boundaries (area is surrounded by defensible
borders )
2.
Sovereignty - Final and Absolute authority within territory
3.
Public Institutions and Roles - The state is a public rather than a private state
4.
Domination - Max Weber: Monopoly of Coercion within a given territory
5.
Legitimacy - Makes domination easier to swallow
6.
Organization Feature:
Defining the State 3:
Lecture 1 - Defining the State
January 5, 2017
11:41 AM
Lecture Notes S2 Page 1
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Legitimacy - Makes domination easier to swallow
6.
Effective government
Relations with other states
There is no difference, international and internal (domestic) are all connected
International Approach Adds:
The state protects its people from each other and also from external threats (provides order,
security and external threats)
Borders define what is internal and external in the first place
The Duality of the State:
War made the state
i.
Feudalism did not fit with the idea with the state
ii.
Feudalism
1.
Protestant Reformation (Split between catholic and protestant) of the church
i.
Key features = brings an end to religious conflict by declaring that each prince
and king would be able to establish the religious character within the people
1)
Peace of Westphalia, 1648: State Controls Religion within territory
ii.
Church prevented the state in forming legitimacy
iii.
The Universal Church
2.
With the Decline of:
The Emergence of the Dual State:
State from internal society, for which it provides rule and order
AND
State from the international sphere, in which competes with other states in absence of order
No rule outside of borders which can lead to war
Dualism's Distinctions:
Compares units
And studies politics under state provided order
Comparative politics: States as units of analysis:
Begins with concept of anarchy (absence of order)
Examines state interactions in absence of rules and enforcement
Has explored surprising sources of order
International Relations: State within state system:
Comparative Politics and International Relations:
Global Extension - It’s a world of states
States Formally Equal
If Highly Unequal in capacity
The Triumph of the State Model:
Managing complex economies
Controlling flows across borders
Defining and defending rights
Sustaining Social Welfare - States responsibilities increase = lead to greater efficiencies produced by
the people
Growing Responsibilities in the Modern Era:
Social power is widely and evenly dispersed
The elected government leads the way
State is neutral
Pluralist State:
Social power is unequal and concentrated
Economy generates hierarchy of classes
Capitalist State:
Pope/Church
1.
Monarch
2.
Nobles
3.
Knights/Vassels
4.
Merchants, Farmers,
5.
Peasants, Serfs
6.
Lecture Notes S2 Page 2
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version