[Political Science 1020E] - Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes fot the exam (123 pages long!)

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Published on 30 Mar 2017
School
Western University
Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Western
Political Science 1020E
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
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Decline of Ebola, guinea worm, polio, malaria, cancer, war deaths, poverty
Terrorism (Paris, San Bernadino, Afghanistan, Tampa)
Continuing challenges: climate change, global poverty, war, refugees
The World in 2016 (Introduction)
How is the world changing?
What is a refugee?
2.5 million
Turkey houses the most amount of refugees
There are 21 million who are refugees
Who are the refugees?
Death of Allan Kurdi (3 year old Syrian boy refugee who was involved in a fatal boating accident)
Why now?
The Refugee Crisis
Syria: civil war, over 400 000 killed
Denmark: well-governed, peaceful, happy, excellent health and education
Why are they so different?
Syria and Denmark
It is not intelligence, propensity to violence, or even geography that explains the differences between Denmark and Syria
It is the state, the rule of law, and accountable government
Politics is about collective choices we make to reduce conflict and promote cooperation
Politics Makes the Difference
Descriptive: How things are
Ex: What is a refugee?
Explanatory: Why things are this way
Ex: How do the political rulers obtain power?
Normative: How things should be
Ex: Should we build a wall?
Ex: Why should the Canadian Medical Association recommend the legal age for marijuana at 21?
Three Types of Questions
Two Central Questions of Politics
Who gets what?
1.
Says who?
2.
Political Ideas
1.
Political Ideologies
2.
TWO MAIN THEMES
Lecture 1 - Introduction
September 8, 2016
11:46 AM
Lecture Notes S1 Page 1
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Define the State
Make sense of the Dualism of the state
Chart changes in the state since its emergence in history
Determine why the state acts and what we should let states do for us
Lecture Plan:
States haven't always existed as there were competitions
Medieval Europe
Rival Forms: Cities, Traditional Kingdoms, Empires
State model proved superior after 1500
State Model is now universal throughout the globe
States are defined by territorial borders
It is possible where states may not exist
Will we ever move to other alternatives to states?
Will we always have states?
The State:
Caring, support
Family: "Particular Altruism" - tight interconnectedness with particular individuals not
generalized
It identifies a sphere of association (e.x. joining a club)
Move from particularism to universalism
Civil society: "Universal Egoism"
It is universal because when we relate to the state, the state deals with us
generally
State: "Universal Altruism"
Development:
State as End of History
Hegelian Idealism: (Idealism) Moving forward of history of human mind, human consciousness
His understanding of the state came from Hegel
Woodrow Wilson: State Idealist (American President, political scientist)
Defining the State 1:
Functionalism: You get what you need
State as provider of order and stability
Marxists: Class conflict - State resolves it
So, What threatens order?
But - State is whatever does this work
Defining the State 2:
Bureaucracy, Military, Police, Courts, etc.
i.
State as specific set of institutions:
1.
Why Treat these collectively as "the state"?
2.
After Hegel, Political Scientists rejected the concept as abstract , unnecessary
3.
Organizational Approach:
Territorial - Demarcated area, defensible borders (demarcated - identifying a specific area)
1.
People - Community defined by territorial boundaries (area is surrounded by defensible
borders )
2.
Sovereignty - Final and Absolute authority within territory
3.
Public Institutions and Roles - The state is a public rather than a private state
4.
Domination - Max Weber: Monopoly of Coercion within a given territory
5.
Legitimacy - Makes domination easier to swallow
6.
Organization Feature:
Defining the State 3:
Lecture 1 - Defining the State
January 5, 2017
11:41 AM
Lecture Notes S2 Page 1
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Document Summary

P o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e 1 0 2 0 e. Decline of ebola, guinea worm, polio, malaria, cancer, war deaths, poverty. Continuing challenges: climate change, global poverty, war, refugees. Someone who is facing violence or persecution usually on the basis of things that threaten their lives. Death of allan kurdi (3 year old syrian boy refugee who was involved in a fatal boating accident) Denmark: well-governed, peaceful, happy, excellent health and education. It is not intelligence, propensity to violence, or even geography that explains the differences between denmark and syria. It is the state, the rule of law, and accountable government. Politics is about collective choices we make to reduce conflict and promote cooperation. Make sense of the dualism of the state. States haven"t always existed as there were competitions. State model is now universal throughout the globe. It is possible where states may not exist.