Political Science 1020E Quiz: Malaria
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Andrew Chater

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Malaria
What is malaria?
Parasitic infection that is spread between people by mosquitoes and is arguably the
most important vector-transmitted disease in the world.
The leading parasitic cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide
0.25 mortality rate
prevalence is so high that even a low mortality rate results in large
number of deaths
200 million clinical cases of malaria in 2013
584,000 people dying from the mosquito-borne disease
3/4 of deaths pregnant women or children under five.
3.3 billion people at risk
55,111,095 DALYs
“Malaria remains the biggest cause of death for children under five in Africa.”
SYMPTOMS
Malaria begins as a flu-like illness 8 to 30 days after infection. Symptoms include
fever.
Typical cycles of fever, shaking chills, and drenching sweats may then
develop.
Death may be due to brain damage (cerebral malaria), or damage to vital
organs.
Malaria is present in over 100 countries.
In sub-Saharan Africa, where it is the single largest cause of death for children under
five, malaria kills nearly one child every minute approximately 1,300 children every
day.
Four nobel prizes have been award for Malaria focussed research and it has been a
major focus of international health efforts
48% decline in # of deaths since 2000
tremendous improvement but still harmful
still large number of deaths
Malaria is preventable and curable.
MALARIA HISTORY
The G & T
Quinine powder from cinchona bark used by indigenous people to prevent and
treat Malaria.
By 1840s British in India were using 700 tons of bark each year for quinine
Quinine so bitter, mixed it with soda and water…..
1870 “Schwepps Indian Quinine Tonic Water
The Panama Canal & the US CDC
26,000 employees building the canal
21,000 (86%) were hospitalized for malaria
many public health lessons were learned from here
Drained pools near houses and villages

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Description
Malaria What is malaria? Parasitic infection that is spread between people by mosquitoes and is arguably the most important vectortransmitted disease in the world. The leading parasitic cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide 0.25 mortality rate prevalence is so high that even a low mortality rate results in large number of deaths 200 million clinical cases of malaria in 2013 584,000 people dying from the mosquitoborne disease 34 of deaths pregnant women or children under five. 3.3 billion people at risk 55,111,095 DALYs Malaria remains the biggest cause of death for children under five in Africa. SYMPTOMS Malaria begins as a flulike illness 8 to 30 days after infection. Symptoms include fever. Typical cycles of fever, shaking chills, and drenching sweats may then develop. Death may be due to brain damage (cerebral malaria), or damage to vital organs. Malaria is present in over 100 countries. In subSaharan Africa, where it is the single largest cause of death for children under five, malaria kills nearly one child every minute approximately 1,300 children every day. Four nobel prizes have been award for Malaria focussed research and it has been a major focus of international health efforts 48 decline in of deaths since 2000 tremendous improvement but still harmful still large number of deaths Malaria ipreventable and curable . MALARIA HISTORY The G T Quinine powder from cinchona bark used by indigenous people to prevent and treat Malaria. By 1840s British in India were using 700 tons of bark each year for quinine Quinine so bitter, mixed it with soda and water.. 1870 Schwepps Indian Quinine Tonic Water The Panama Canal the US CDC 26,000 employees building the canal 21,000 (86) were hospitalized for malaria many public health lessons were learned from here Drained pools near houses and villages
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