polisci 2102 nov 1.docx

6 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 2102A/B
Professor
notapp
Semester
Fall

Description
N OVEMBER  1, 2011 • Next week’s test – 3 questions, you answer 2 • The questions that will be on the test are on Webct – it will be one of these • Exam is one hour in length • Approach the question as if he does not know the answer – given the amount of time, answer based on this F RIEDRICH  H AYEK • The godfather of modern conservatism • Austrian, born in 1899 • Grew up in Austria, witnessed the rise of communism and fascism in Europe • Wrote a number of important works • The Constitution of Liberty (1970) • Law, Legislation and Liberty • Most important political philosophy texts • Biggest concern: extension of individual liberty • Not concerned with greater degrees of equality (as Keynes was) • Conflict between liberty and equality are ongoing debates in political science o Modern political thought is very much a debate over which of these two values is more important and  which brings about the “good life” • In the 1930s/40s there was a movement towards collectivism o Comes in 2 forms: one from the right, one from the left o Left: communism o Right: fascism • Moved to England in 1936 (middle of the depression) • There was a great deal of attraction to planned society o The notion of planning as an approach to economic management o Fairly popular in England at the time o Many left­wing scholars looked at the Soviet Union as a good example • To Hayek – the idea of planning as management of economic affairs was bad o Planning could have significant impacts on the ability of citizens to exercise their liberties o Dangerous to individual liberty • Wrote about this in his book The Road to Serfdom (1944) • Student of Mise – one of the founding members of the Austrian school of economics o Belief that markets are absolutely independent • Hayek brings Mise into the English­speaking world • In this book, he argues that a capitalist economy is coordinated in a manner that most people are unaware of; the  market is kind of planned anyway, even in the absence of government o This is not a new idea – Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand o Smith’s most important idea is the division of labour that leads to productivity o The division of knowledge is even more important o Markets permit a division of knowledge that allows people with that knowledge to know how, when and  where to allocate resources to improving the well­being of society o Knowledge is well dispersed o Markets act as a mechanism for how to apply that knowledge • The market allocates this better than any government can o In other words, the knowledge of how to allocate resources is something a government planner can never  do o People understand the market o Depends on the ability to perceive opportunity, know how to take advantage of that opportunity – this is  associated with the entrepreneur rather than the bureaucrat • Government and bureaucrats (he is more heavily sceptical of the latter) • The market is fundamental and important to function as a market because it is a mechanism for two things: o Disperses economic information o Human purpose:  • There is no such thing as economic values o Economic considerations are simply a means to some other purpose • The market is about more than economics • We all have purposes that we want to achieve – to achieve these, we need the functioning market • The notion of the market being about self­interest is a misunderstood idea o It implies that all economic activity is in the pursuit of selfish aims o But, interests are both material and ideal – it makes no sense to separate self­interest from purpose o Purpose can be both material and altruistic – in order to pursue them, requires the functioning of the  marketplace • Money has no value except in a means to some other end o Money in itself cannot be a purpose o The purpose is what we can do with the money • Criticizes Smith’s definition of freedom o Smith: every man who does not violate the laws of justice is perfectly free to pursue his interests o Problem: connects the notion of freedom to selfishness o “A state in which each can use his knowledge for his purposes” is what Hayek proposes o To try and plan an economy is the same thing to plan a life; no one would want a government bureaucrat  to plan their life • Economic control implies control of all aspects of people’s lives o If we succumb to the planners, than the ends/values the planners have will become the ends/values of  everyone • For Hayek, economic planning is only possible at a high price in liberal society o It would require a consensus about what the appropriate values of the society should be o The state should be neutral in a liberal society, not moral o The state has no educative value – one of the problems of communis
More Less

Related notes for Political Science 2102A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit