Study Guides (248,152)
Canada (121,347)
Psychology (1,705)
Midterm

Exam3Notes.docx

7 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2075
Professor
William Fisher
Semester
Fall

Description
Human Sexuality Exam 3 Notes Lecture 1: HIV­AIDS ­AIDS discovered by CDC clerk 1981, HIV the AIDS causing virus discovered in 1984 ­Crossover from primates simian immunodeficiency virus, silent spread 1910­1950 ­HIV transmission is inverse function of HIV RNA (access to bloodstream) and  individual’s viral load (healthy cells)   ­most healthy at primary infection, no HIV RNA   ­at death all HIV RNA, no healthy lymphocytes  ­HIV transmission occurs through sexual behavior, needle sharing, blood transfusions,  tissue transplantation and occupational exposure   ­No risk: kissing, hand­genital sex   ­Low risk: oral sex   ­high risk: unprotected anal­penile or vaginal­penile intercourse ­1981­1996: period of fear, therapeutic impotence and death   ­1993­1995: period of AIDS surveillance case definition expanded (1993)   + introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (1995)   ­AIDS diagnoses peaked at 1993, AIDS deaths peaked at 1995 ­Ryan White expelled from school 1986 for having AIDS   ­hemophiliac, got it from blood transfusion, poorly understood disease   ­prosecuted because of the stigma that AIDS was a “gay men disease” ­Vancouver AIDS conference 1996: era of highly active antiretroviral therapy   ­HIV undergoes rapid, error prone replication   ­critical for multidrug intervention early in infection   ­critical importance of adherence to therapy, viral load test, viral escape ­increase in people living with HIV from 1996­2007   ­known as the era of antiretroviral therapy   ­struggle to make drugs available to AIDS epidemic epicenters   ­focus on adherence to medication and avoidance of multidrug resistance ­Current state of the epidemic: treatment as prevention   ­biomedical tsunami: focus on treatment as prevention   ­de­emphasis of safer sex, safer needle use, maintenance of behavior change Lecture 2: Erotica, Pornography  ­Estimated that Americans spend 13 billion per year on pornography ­Males vs. Females (Psych 2075)   ­males highest % couple times a week/ daily (43.5 and 23.1)   ­females highest % never/ rarely (36.2 and 30.1) ­Social psychological theories relevant to possible effects of porn:   ­observational learning theory: acquiring potential patterns of behavior   ­social learning theory: acquiring expectations and consequences    ­classical conditioning: conditioned arousal to new sexual cues (seen in porn)   ­script theory: learning new sexual scripts (hi pizza guy, lets have sex) ­Consequences of labeling:   ­liberal sexual upbringing  ▯non pornographic as response to film  ▯little    behavioral change in sex   ­restricted sexual upbringing  ▯thought film was pornographic  ▯large    increase in sexual behavior  ­all types of pornography (violent and non­violent) affects aggressive attitudes and  behaviors (?)  ▯all dangerous? ­U.S. President’s Commission: erotica leads to small, short term, non­novel increases in  sexual behavior   ­married couples view erotica weekly showed increase in intercourse per    night after viewing an erotic film but only in the first week    ­additionally, couples only engaged in non­novel behavior and positions   ­were not encouraged to try anything new or crazy, just had more normal sex ­Byrne and Lamberth: men and women were parallel in self reported sexual arousal in  response to 3 types of erotic stimuli   ­imagined erotica was twice as arousing than slides and literature   ­also nearly identical patterns in arousal patterns to movie in male/female   ­married men and women had same response patterns to erotic themes of    love and lust but different in casual sex theme (4.00 vs. 5.17 men/women) ­Chivers & Bailey: women were not category specific when it came to genital sexual  arousal but men were (somewhat)   ­both genders were category specific for sexual arousal  ­Violent pornography and aggression against women:   ­pornography as model: teachers normative behavior with little counter    information   ­pornography as disinhibitor: you can get away with it, nothing bad happens   ­pornography as incentive: violence against women “works”, gets sex ­Malamuth: violent pornography and sexual fantasy   ­men exposed to rape slides; 56% had rape fantasies   ­men exposed to consenting sex; 0% had rape fantasies ­Malamuth: violent pornography and beliefs about rape   ­men exposed to tape of rape: guessed 23% women enjoy getting raped   ­guessed only 11% would be disgusted ­angry and non­angry males had highest level of mean shock delivered to female victim  after watching aggressive positive porn   ­opposed to neutral, erotic, and aggressive negative porn films   ­court wants to ban all pornography to decrease the amount of violence against women,  do not take into account the low prevalence of violent porn   ­less than 1% in playboy/ penthouse   ­few violent sexual acts in XXX videos   ­80% videos contained non, .17 coercive acts per video   ­perps of violent sexual acts are often female   ­magazines 65%, videos 49%, internet 42% ­In Denmark, the legalization of pornography made no change/ even a decline in the sex  crime rates  ­In Germany, legalization of pornography made no change in the number of sexual  assaults ­In Japan, highest rates of rape themes pornography yet extremely low rates of sexual  assault ­In criminals, percentage of normal inmates that had seen sexually explicit photos was  higher in every category than rapists/ sexual offenders   ­eg. partially nude male/female, fully nude male/female, hetero/homosexual    intercourse, oral sex, bondage   ­non­sex offenders used more pornography than offenders   ­none of juvenile sex offenders stated porn as reason for committing crime   ­inverse relationship??? ­Davies, Reiss et al: rejection of sexual violence a function of self­regulated exposure to  X­rated videotapes   ­men who rented 3+ XXX videos a week were most rejecting of sex violence   ­eg. favor law on marital rape, incarceration 10+ years for date rape, favor    equal rights amendment, etc ­Malamuth and Ceniti 1986: found that exposure to violent and non­violent pornography  did not have long term effects on male aggression towards women ­Fisher and Grenier: failed to replicate classic findings on whether porn causes men to  fantasize about rape (neutral, erotic, porn/pos and porn/neg)   ­% rape fantisies after exposure: 0% across all 4 categories   ­% acceptance of rape myths after exposure: ~28/105 across categories   ­% negative attitude towards women after exposure: ~105/165 all category ­If subjects could walk away from the experiment, after provocation and exposure to rape  theme; 84% chose to leave and only 16% chose to stay and aggress ­Internet porn:    ­accessible: anywhere to anyone of any age   ­affordable: low/ no cost, no need to purchase to see XXX   ­anonymous: usually accessed alone, no trail led back to individual   ­individually tailored: wide array of materials, individual can choose to select     whatever they please to their sexual preferences  ­Barak, Fisher, et al: higher proportion of sexually explicit bookmarks meant lower  proportion of:   ­negative attitudes toward women   ­rape myth acceptance   ­women as managers scale   ­likelihood of sexual harassment  ­“confluence model” Malamuth, Addison et al: college men who read sexual magazines  and had 5 antisocial background factors self­reported aggression against women (high  levels) ­Fisher et al: internet porn prevalence increased drastically from 1995­2005 yet rates of  sexual assault decreased steadily (inverse relationship) ­Where do we go from here? Censorship?   ­antidemocratic model: much like pornography   ­reinforces erotophobia – sex back in the closet   ­ineffective even in totalitarian regimes   ­Bill C­54 on obscenity ­educational immunization? Immunizes to reject the lie of porn   ­potentially effective and generalized effects   ­doesn’t reinforce erotophobia   ­models democratic solution to social problem ­commercial sex work: why do people do it?   ­money (avg 74,010), sex (pleaseure) and attention (fame, glamour)   ­likes: money, people, sex, freedom, attention   ­dislikes: people, STD risks, exploitation ­prostitution: street whores, massage parlors, call in (brothels), call out (escorts), males  (hustlers) ­pimp: manager and sometimes partner of sex worker, usually safer sex when working for  a pimp (with clients) ­madam: woman who manages a in call or out call service ­“johns”: term used by sex workers in reference to their clients   ­50% of clients are occasional, 50% are repeats/ regulars    ­49% in one study had a spouse or regular partner already ­sex trafficking: recruiting, controlling, exploiting sex workers by threat/ force ­Canadian laws on prostitution:   ­pimping is illegal (living off avails of whores)   ­communicating in public to sell sex is illegal   ­keeping a common bawdy house (where sex is sold) is illegal   ­workers usually prosecuted more than clients   ­women more than men (sex workers)   ­street wo
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2075

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit