Study Guides (248,633)
Canada (121,642)
Sociology (980)
Prof (5)

Lec 6 Industrial Rev.docx

5 Pages
45 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
Sociology 2235
Professor
Prof

This preview shows pages 1 and half of page 2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
Description
Lec 6—Oct. 2 -Historical details about Canada not necessary for exam Industrial Societies 1900s Society -Time of great transition (evolutionary) -Altered families most dramatically -Wages, becoming capital society -Major change: saw employment that was previously either based in the home/part of the home (ex. Farming) to labour outside the home such as employment at a shop or factory -Separation of home and work -Family wage economy (NOT the same as family based economy) -Wage paid to male worker (thus expected to support family) -Family interdependency: no security or employment insurance when sick -Families worked together in mills and factories (employer or employer would push for hiring of family members) -Living next to factory not uncommon -Social class division emerged Family -Unit of consumption more than production -Breadwinner-homemaker family structure (beginning of this) -Fertility rate declined—smaller families -Economic liabilities -Less kids more manageable -Less self-reliant (dependent on wage) -Ex. Becoming urbanized thus can’t produce own food -More isolated (moving away) -More integrated into economy Marriage -Later age at marriage (biggest reason: started compulsory education) -Based on romantic love -Stressed attraction, respect and affection when choosing partners -No longer arranged marriages -Guy walking on side closer to road (Shield women from carriage splashes and waste that families throw out the window) -Focus on self development -Personal happiness important Women -Identities centered entirely in families -Shopping became leisure activity because it was one of the few places women could go without needing men to escort them Lec 6—Oct. 2 -“Homework” trivialized (housework) -Responsible for viability of marriages -Emotional labour: things women do to nurture family such as remembering birthdays and organizing celebrations -Gender-specific occupations -Paid work: maid, teacher, nurse -Middle class women: running shops -Hard time pursuing occupations outside norm -Sexual harassment and assault common -Unmarried, single, widowed, divorced women had a hard time -Likely lived in poverty, hard to find work -Thus single women began moving to cities to work -No jobs paid enough wage to be independent, eventually had to find partner -May not want to return to domestic sphere: scary re-entering relationship -Fall prey to moral temptations -Unacceptable if not married and pregnant -Married women supported by husbands -Money earned was to “supplement” husbands -Working compromised husband’s position in family (head of the house) -Seen as husband unable to support you, wife has to go out and earn $ -Working mothers not good for children -Bad cognitively, psychologically and morally (still in debate) -Tender years doctrine (had to be with kids for first 7 years) -Frowned upon if women chose work over looking after kids Men -“Head of household” -Exerted authority over families -Became breadwinners -Wage expected to support whole family (tough) Children -Parents’ love objects (during hunting and gathering, industrial society, 1950s) -Extended period of dependency on parents -Formal education began -Supervised—feared “idle youth” -Taught values & habits -Tasks differentiated by sex -Boys banged chalkboard erasers Lec 6—Oct. 2 The Golden Age of the Family Society -Period of experimentation -Pro family period (family centered society) -TV depicted family “ideal” -Ex. Father Knows Be
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1 and half of page 2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit