Lecture 2

4 Pages
52 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2267A/B
Professor
Georgios Fthenos
Semester
Fall

Description
Youth in Conflict with the Law November 13, 2012 – Street­Involved Youth in Canada  Introduction ­ Street­involved youth o Youth 25 years of age or younger who do not have a safe home or are  underhoused (homeless); visible in major Canadian cities and urban centres o Forced to leave their families of origin o Have run away from their homes without the consent of their parent or guardian  or who left foster or group­care replacements o Who are not living on the street but who engage in street­involved activities and  identify with street culture and peer groupings ­ Insufficient attention has been given to the service needs of street­involved youth Defining Street­Involved Youth vs. Homeless Adults ­ Kinds of street­involved youth: o Throwaways: youth asked or encouraged to leave home by their  parents/guardians with the purpose of ending parental responsibility o Runaways: youth who have left their homes/welfare placement, at least  overnight, without the consent of their parents/guardians o Those not living on street but who engage in street­involved activities ­ Risk actors for homeless adults and street­involved youth are similar, but the factors that  trigger street involvement for youth and adults are different ­ Why people become homeless: o Affordable housing – rent becomes too high o Exclusion from affordable housing – discrimination or racism o Employment opportunities – less likely to be able to support housing without a  job o Institutional supports – access to welfare, health services Typologies of Street­Involved Youth ­ Typologies help researchers and practitioners understand the unique characteristics of  youth who are involved in the street and to develop services designed to meet their  current needs ­ Auerswalk and Eyre’s (2002) life­cycle model: proposes series of stages that youth  encounter on street and includes initial engagement in street life, a stage where youth  become more comfortable with street life, and periods of crisis during which some may  transition off the street; a cyclical pattern is noted, in their many who exit the street may  become reinvolved  o Programs are often short­term effects Numbers of Street­Involved Youth ­ To date, there are no accurate estimates for the Canadian street­involved youth population ­ There are many difficulties and challenges involved in attempting to estimate the number  of street­involved youth ­ Who qualifies as someone who is homeless o No fixed address/inadequate housing o Rough sleeper – directly on pavement, in an alleyway o People in shelters Youth in Conflict with the Law o SRO – single room occupancy o Couch surfing – hopping from one couch or bed to another ­ Issues to consider while planning an estimate or count of the number of street­involved  youth: o What criteria determine street involvement? o How should street­involved youth be contacted? o How do we estimate youth who do not use traditional resources? Perspectives on Street­Involved Youth ­ The perspective with which we view street­involved youth in Canada has a great impact  on the way we respond to the needs of this population ­ Ecological perspective puts focus on the interaction of the individual with different  systems (school, peers, community resources, child welfare, government) and within the  predominant values, attitudes, and philosophies of society Pathways to the Street – The Vulnerable Population ­ Youth become involved with street life in a variety of ways, including: o Leaving home as a result of family conflict, disruption, and maltreatment o Because they were thrown out or forced to leave, or because they sought further  independence o Following early exit from or aging­out of the child­welfare system o Foster care system – age of 18 you no longer qualify for services (age­out) Family Experiences ­ A large percentage of street­involved youth report a history of child maltreatment at the  hands of their caregivers ­ The maltreatment experienced by street­involved youth is consistently reported to be  chronic, extreme, and initiated at a young age ­ Father or step­father is the number one perpetrator ­ Usually the child has a child by their father because of rape ­ Children who experience maltreatment within their family may resort to running away  from home as an alternative to the abuse or neglect Child­Welfare Experiences ­ Street­involved youth often have histories of involvement with the child welfare system ­ Youth are not consistently well served by child­welfare system Life on the Streets ­ Youth who transition from home to street enter a new world with its own culture, norms,  and rules ­ The experience of the street is characterized by feelings of loneliness, disorientation, and  the need to survive ­ Youth find street mentors and become acculturated t
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2267A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit