Writing 2121F/G Study Guide - Quiz Guide: University Of Western Ontario, Begging, General Idea

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Published on 15 Nov 2011
School
Western University
Department
Writing
Course
Writing 2121F/G
Professor
November 15, 2011 Lecture
- Quiz on November 17: Chapter 40, 41, 44 + Bonus 37
-add commas, colons, semi-colons, apostrophe’s
-Bonus Quiz: paragraphs that are punctuated; underline verbs
-Takes 4 best marks from the 5 quizzes
Sources
-Know your thesis: What is the purpose of the text? Persuasive, Argumentative, informative?
-Consider whether the thesis is stated or implied
-Think about how the author develops their thesis (by referring to evidence)
-What form does the evidence take? Facts, statistics, examples; expert opinion cited
-Does the author make an Appeal? Are they appealing to your intellect, reason, or are they
appealing to you emotionally (pathos)? Inappropriate Appeals: logical fallacies (chapter 4)
-Fallacies:
-Oversimplifications: either/or fallacy (the author only gives two options for something
when there are many more) , hasty generalizations (without going into appropriate
evidence)
-complex issue represented in simplistic manner
-Evasion: Begging the question in which one states an opinion as though it were fact.
“UWO is greatest school in the country”
-writer is turning away from issue at hand.
-can also consist of direct addresses to the reader: flattery, if you feel like you’re
being patronized.
-if writer tries to evoke fear or pity: just an attempt to play on emotions in
absence of any compelling evidence.
-You don’t have to identify all fallacies, but realize that they are there and evidence
you’re getting in your sources might not be accurate
-Genre: type, conventions (lengthy plot summary in film reviews)
-you can’t criticize a film review of lengthy plot summary because it’s supposed to be
there.
-Author’s biases: consider if they affect negatively their argument. Is their perspective so
narrow that it’s affecting what they’re trying to say?
-maybe their voice/tone contributes negatively to their argument
-Ineffective sources
-If you think a source is totally ineffective, don’t use it. Try to see it’s strengths and
weaknesses.
-When looking at sources:
-Look at their thesis to get the general idea of the source
-Look at the evidence: Is it relevant, ample, current, anecdotal?
-Research author and every direct reference they make
-What’s effective about it and what’s ineffective?
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Document Summary

Quiz on november 17: chapter 40, 41, 44 + bonus 37. Bonus quiz: paragraphs that are punctuated; underline verbs. Takes 4 best marks from the 5 quizzes. Consider whether the thesis is stated or implied. Think about how the author develops their thesis (by referring to evidence) Oversimplifications: either/or fallacy (the author only gives two options for something when there are many more) , hasty generalizations (without going into appropriate evidence) Evasion: begging the question in which one states an opinion as though it were fact. Writer is turning away from issue at hand. Can also consist of direct addresses to the reader: flattery, if you feel like you"re being patronized. If writer tries to evoke fear or pity: just an attempt to play on emotions in absence of any compelling evidence. You don"t have to identify all fallacies, but realize that they are there and evidence you"re getting in your sources might not be accurate.

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