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Midterm

Midterm 1 Notes A FULL summary of Chapters 1-4 and OB appendix compressed into 20 pages. All the important points, side notes, terms, graphs and anything that may be in the midterm from the book is included. These notes are NOT class notes, but are PUREL


Department
Business
Course Code
BU288
Professor
Simon Taggar
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 20 pages of the document.
Contents
BU288 notes Chapter 1: Organizational Behaviour and Management ........................................... 1
Research in OB ............................................................................................................................... 6
Chap2 Notes .................................................................................................................................... 7
BU288: Chapter 2 notes Part II ....................................................................................................... 9
Chap 3: Perceptions, Attributions and Diversity .......................................................................... 11
Chapter 4 Values, Attitudes and Work Behaviour........................................................................ 16
BU288 notes Chapter 1: Organizational Behaviour and Management
Organizations
Organizations are social inventions for accomplishing common goals through group effort.
Social Inventions
Social Inventions simply refers to the idea that organizations essential characteristic is the
coordinated presence of people, not necessarily things. The field of organizational behaviour is
about understanding people and managing them to work efficiently.
Goal Accomplishment:
The field of organizational behaviour is concerned with how organizations can survive and adapt
to change.
Be motivated to join and remain in the organization
Carry out their basic work reliably, in terms of productivity, quality and service
Be willing to continuously learn and upgrade their knowledge and skills
Be flexible and innovative.
Group Effort
The field of organizational behaviour is concerned with how to get people to practise effective
teamwork.

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Organizational Behaviour
Organizational behaviour is the attitudes and behaviours of individuals and groups in
organizations.
Goals of Organizational Behaviour
Predicting Organizational Behaviour
The regularity of behaviour in organizations permits the prediction of its future occurrence.
Explaining Organizational Behaviour Explain why some events occur, Organizational
Behaviour is interested in determining why people are more or less motivated, satisfied or prone
to resign.
Managing Organizational Behaviour Management is the art of getting things accomplished
in organizations through others. If behaviour can be predicted and explained, it can be controlled
and managed.
Early Prescriptions Concerning Management
2 Basic view points: the Classical viewpoint and the human relations view.
The Classical View and Bureaucracy
The classical viewpoint is an early prescription on management that advocated high
specialization of labour, intensive coordination and centralized decision making.
Each department was to tend to its own affairs, with centralized decision making from
upper management providing coordination.
Scientific Management Fredrick Taylor’s system for using research to determine the optimum
degree of specialization and standardization of work tasks.
Bureaucracy Max Weber’s ideal type of organization that included a strict chain of command,
detailed rules, high specialization, centralized power and selection and promotion based on
technical competence.
A strict chain of command which each member reports to only a single superior
Criteria for selection and promotion based on impersonal technical skills rather than
nepotism (favouritism shown to friends/family) or favouritism.
A set of detailed rules, regulations and procedures ensuring that the job gets done
regardless of who the specific worker is.
The use of strict specialization to match duties with technical competence
The centralization of power at the top of the organization.

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Human Relations Movement and a Critique of Bureaucracy
Hawthorne Studies Research conducted at the Hawthorne plant of Western Electric near
Chicago in the 1920s and 1930s that illustrated how psychological and social processes affect
productivity and work adjustment.
Human Relations Movement A critique of classical management and bureaucracy that
advocated management styles that were more participative and oriented toward employee needs.
Strict specialization is incompatible with human needs for growth and achievement. This
can lead to employee alienation from the organization and its clients.
Strong centralization and reliance on formal authority often fail to take advantage of the
creative ideas and knowledge of lower-level members, who are often closer to the
customer. As a result, the organizations will fail to learn from its mistakes, which
threaten innovation and adaption. Resistance to change will occur as a matter of course.
Strict impersonal rules lead to members to adopt the minimum acceptable level of
performance that the rules specify. If a rule states that employees must process at least
eight claims a day, eight claims will become the norm, even though higher performance
levels are possible.
Strong specialization causes employees to lose sight of the overall goals of the
organization. Forms, procedures and required signatures become ends in themselves,
divorced from the true needs of customers, clients and other departments in the
organization. This is the “red-tape mentality” that we sometimes observe in
bureaucracies.
Contemporary Management The Contingency Approach
Contingency Approach An approach to management that recognizes that there is no one best
way to manage, and that an appropriate management style depends on the demands of the
situation.
What do Managers Do?
Managerial Roles
Interpersonal roles Expected behaviours that have to do with establishing and maintaining
interpersonal relations
Figurehead role Managers serve as symbols of their organization rather than active
decision makers
Leadership Role Managers select, mentor reward and discipline employees
Liaison Role Managers maintain horizontal contacts inside and outside the
organization.
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