ES 102 Notes.docx

15 Pages
285 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Environmental Studies
Course
ES102
Professor
Edmund Okoree
Semester
Winter

Description
Lesson 7: Non­renewable energy  Evaluating energy resources − 99% of earths heat comes from the sun − 1% from burning fossil fuels − Earth’s average temperature would be ­240 degrees Celsius  − Solar energy comes from nuclear fusion of hydrogen atoms that make up the sun’s  mass − Renewable solar energy include: • Wind, water, biomass − Most nonrenewable energy comes from extracting and burning minerals from the  earths crust  − Primary carbon­containing fossil fuels:  • Oil, coal, natural gas Oil − Located in trapped hydrocarbons below the earth’s surface  − Located in regions where there is sedimentary bedrock  − Trapped in layers  − Canada accounts for 14% of the worlds oil reserves  − U.S.A owns 3%  − Oil clean up is costly and time consuming Arctic oil and gas pipelines − Disrupt caribou migration between Alaska and Canada  − Drilling and pipeline upset the caribou and their migration  − Caribou are essential component of the culture and economy of the First Nations  Alberta Tar Sands − Has not been developed because of limitations in the ability to separate the oils  from clay, sand and water it is mixed with Gulf oil spill  − In 2010 an oil spill occurred in April off the Gulf of Mexico  − There was an explosion and fire on a drilling rig that was leased and operated by  British Petroleum (BP)  − Gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf waters near New Orleans  Coal resources  − Staple fossil fuels − Primary fuel source for many countries − 65% of worlds electricity  Nuclear energy  − Accounts for 15% in Canada in 2005 − Mining of uranium takes place in Ontario  − Chernobyl happened in the Ukraine which was the result of a flawed reactor  design that was operated inadequately (1986)  − Three mile island happened in the U.S where a reactor melted down  Commercial energy sources  − 84% comes from nonrenewable energy sources − 78% from fossil fuels and 6% from nuclear power − Oil is the largest contributor  − ½ of the worlds population in developing countries burn wood and charcoal  − Fuel wood shortage is expected to get worse due to unsustainable practices Energy future  − U.S.A is the largest trading partner with Canada  − U.S.A is the worlds largest energy consumer  − Americans consume more energy in a day than a person in the poor country  consumes in a year  − U.S.A used 24% of the worlds commercial energy in 2004 (4.6% of the worlds  population)  Lesson 8: Energy efficiency  Energy efficiency – is a measure of the useful energy produced by an energy conversion  device compared to the energy that ends up being converted to low quality heat  Energy efficiency  − By replacing light bulbs to more efficient models you can reduce pollution,  emissions and save money  − 84% of energy in N.A is wasted  − 41% is wasted automatically because of the degradation of energy quality  − 43% I wasted unnecessarily  − You can save money and energy by buying more energy efficient cars, lighting,  heating, water heaters, air conditioners and appliances  − Some energy efficient appliances might cost more initially but in the long time  they save money  − Incandescent light bulbs waste 95% of the energy it creates Net energy efficiency  − The only energy that really counts in net energy  − Net energy efficiency of a system is used to heat your house and is determined by  the efficiency of each step in the energy conversion for the system − To save energy keep the number of steps to a minimum and strive to have the  highest possible energy efficiency for each step in an energy conversion process  How can we save energy? − Cogeneration is a combined heat and power system that creates two forms of  energy (energy efficiency of 80­90% and emit 2/3 less CO2 emissions)  − Replace energy wasting electric motors  ▯waste of energy because they run at full  speed and consumes more than 10 times its purchase cost in electricity  − Switch to higher efficiency fluorescent lighting − Replace gas guzzling cars  − Encourage car companies to develop hybrid cars − Reduce the countries dependence on oil  − Reduce carbon dioxide emissions  Hybrid electric cars − Pioneered in the 1980s by Amory Lovins (physicist)  − Runs on gas, diesel or natural gas − Uses an electric motor and battery  ▯rechargeable  − Well suited for stop­and­go city driving  Fuel­cell cars  − A device combines hydrogen gas and oxygen gas field to produce electricity and  water vapor  − Twice as efficient  − Little maintenance and produce little to no pollution  − Will be on the market by 2020 Renewable energy − Replacements to fossil fuels  − Adapt more compact systems, with smaller equipment that has less of an impact Solar energy − One of the most reliable of all the renewable energies − Accounts for 0.5% of energy supplies (25% by 2040) − Can range from small scale portable units to large power plants  − Passive solar energy is produced by not using any mechanical systems  − Active solar energy production uses pumps/fans to circulate fluid or air  Hydropower − Renewable energy source  − Large dams account for 20% of the worlds power − Small scale hydro projects provide versatility in energy supplies and inexpensive  alternatives  − Dependent on predictable and reliable water sources  − Many regions experience droughts and fluctuations in water flow which could  limit the reliability of these projects  Wind power − Production has increased tenfold over the past 20 years − Denmark is leading the way in EU wind power − Costs are high − Uses a lot of land  − Make noise  − Kill birds  − Can get damaged during lightening storms  Biomass − Ethanol is a high octane motor fuel  − Liquid alcohol made of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon  − Obtained from fermentation of sugar or starch   − Since 1980s all gas cars contain ethanol (10%)  − Reduces our dependence on non­renewable fossil fuels and generates new  markets  − Renewable, environmentally friendly and is cleaner than gasoline  − Released carbon dioxide into the atmosphere − Lead to a decrease in food production if land is used for biomass production  Tidal power − Harvest energy from tides − Tides move in and out in response to the gravitational pull of the moon and sun − Sites for production is limited to the size of tide and configuration of the bay in  which the water is channeled  − Limited number of long term projects  − Most sites are located in the Bay of Fundy  Geothermal  − From internal heating of the earth  − Volcanoes and geysers release this energy  Lesson 9: Biodiversity Biodiversity  o We have disturbed 83% of earths land surface  o 82% of temperate deciduous forests have been cleared  o The current global extinction rate of species is at 100 times what it was before  humans existed  1. Decreasing • Extreme weather conditions  • Environmental disturbance  • Environmental stress • Resource shortages  • Non­native species introduction  • Isolation  2. Increasing   • Middle stages of succession  • Moderate environmental disturbance  • Small changes to environmental conditions  • Diverse habitat  • Evolution  Species distribution  − Most of the species of insects are found in the equatorial regions (tropics) Hotspots 1. Freshwater richness • Asia and South America  2. Amphibian species richness • South America, Africa, Asia and Australia  3. Freshwater turtle richness  • Australia  Species decline  − Related to human activity  − Due to increasing reliance on human systems  − Demand for resources is due to an increasing population  − Less value placed on wildlife and natural habitats compared to lands that provide  timber and crops  Canadian forest industry  − Across central Canada in the Canadian shield and in B.C − Staple resource in Canada for 200 years − Land has been cleared extensively in some regions  − Classified as deciduous and coniferous  − Access to crown land for harvesting is granted by the government to private  companies − The amount cut is controlled to make the industry more sustainable  − Dominated by softwood lumber  ▯found in the Boreal forest  Deforestation  − In Brazil, Africa and Asia 50% of the tropical forests have been harvested  − Theses forests are home to 50% of the biodiversity  − Can decrease forest soil fertility − Runoff can erode the soil − Cause loss of habitat  − Cause regional climate change  − Releases CO2 into the atmosphere  Why should we care about biodiversity?  − We should preserve diversity because it’s genes, species, ecosystems and  ecological processes have value (intrinsic and existence value)  − They also have instrumental value because of their usefulness to us  Approaches to protect biodiversity  1. Species approach • Protect species from premature extinction  • Identify endangered species and protect habitats  • Legally protect endangered species 2. Ecosystem approach • Protect population of species in their natural habitat  • Preserve sufficient areas of habitats in different biomes and aquatic systems  • Protect habitat areas through government action  • Eliminate or reduce populations of non­native species • Manage protected areas  Conservation biology  − Slow down the rate at which we are destroying and degrading the Earths  biodiversity  − Identify endangered and species­ rich ecosystems (hot spots) − Send rapid assessment teams of biologists to evaluate the situation and make  recommendations  Bioinformatics  − Science of managing, analyzing and communicating biological information − Uses tools such as high­resolution digitized images to photograph and analyze  specimens of known species and possible new ones − Builds computer databases to hold images and sequence DNA  Canada’s public lands − 93% of Canada’s land is under public ownership  − 16% of Canada’s forested land is managed by the federal government  − 77% of Canada’s public land is provincially managed  Types of forests o Forests occupy 30% of Earth’s land surface 1. Old­growth forests • Uncut forest that has not been seriously disturbed by human activities  • Storehouses for biodiversity because they provide ecological niches for  species • 32% of the worlds forests are old­growth  2. Second­growth forests • Trees resulting from secondary ecological succession  • Develop after the trees in the area have been removed by human activitie • 63% of the worlds forests are second­growth forests  3. Tree plantation  • Managed tract with uniformly aged trees of one species that are harvested by  clear­cutting as soon as they are commercially valuable  • 5% are tree plantations  Forests 1. Ecological services • Support energy and chemical cycling • Reduce erosion  • Purify water/air • Influence climates • Store carbon • Habitats  2. Economic services • Pulp for paper • Lumber • Fueldwood  • Mining • Livestock grazing • Recreation • Jobs  Forest management systems  1. Even­aged management  • Involves maintaining trees in a given stand at about the same age and size  2. Uneven­aged management  • Involves maintaining a variety of tree species in a stand at many ages and  sizes  3. Multiple use forests  • Combine forest use such as hunting, hiking and logging in a manageable  landscape  4. Multifunctional forests  • Recognizes the various goods and services that are provided by a forest  • These goods and services are beneficial to the whole ecosystem and human  systems  Tree harvesting 1. Selective cutting • Cut singly or in small groups  • Reduces crowding and encourages new growth  2. Shelterwood cutting • Removes all mature trees in an area in two or tree cuttings over a period of  time 3. Seed­tree cutting • Loggers harvest all of stand’s trees in one cutting but leave a few uniformly  distributed seed­producing trees to regenerate  4. Clear­cutting  • Removes all trees from an area in a single cut Lesson 1
More Less

Related notes for ES102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit