Study Guides (248,279)
Canada (121,455)
Psychology (693)
PS102 (70)
Midterm

PS 101 Midterm 1 Study Notes

7 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS102
Professor
Kathy Foxall
Semester
Winter

Description
PS101: Chapters 1&2 Study Notes Intro to Psychology • Psychology is rooted in science and philosophy; “the study of the mind” • Confucius, Socrates, and Plato discussed the importance of an educated mind • Wundt and Titchener were the pioneers of psychology: Wundt set up the first psychology  lab in 1879; psychology labs spread throughout Europe and North America • In 1938­39 the Canadian Psychology Association was established; the American  Psychology Association was established in 1892 • Psychologists initially worked within the domains of applied psychology (the branch of  psychology concerned with everyday, practical problems) • During WW2, things changed dramatically in psychology. Academic psychologists were  pressed into service to aid soldiers suffering from trauma. Thus, clinical psychology  emerged. Explaining why the 1950s was such a crucial time for psychology. • In the 1950s and 60s research started to focus on cognition (cognition refers to mental  process involved in acquiring knowledge). Cognitive theorists have argued that psychology  must study internal mental events to fully understand behavior  Structuralism ­ This was Wundt and Titchener’s approach • Attempted to analyze consciousness  • Structuralists depended on INTROSPECTION, the careful/systematic self­observation of  one’s own conscious experience  Functionalism • Based on the belief that psychology should investigate the function/purpose of  consciousness, rather than its structure • Main person behind functionalism was William James (1842­1910). He based much of his  thinking on the work of Charles Darwin and illustrated how psychology is deeply imbedded  in a network of cultural/intellectual influences  Behaviorism • Studied by James B. Watson (1913) • “Nature vs, Nurture debate” • The belief that behavior came entirely from environmental experiences  • Theoretical orientation based on premise that scientific psychology should study only  observable behavior  • Watson believed he could take infants and turn them into anything  • Watson was, ultimately, proved wrong by his own children. (Eg. One child was seriously  depressed and killed himself – Watson could do nothing about it).   • B.F. Skinner was an influential behaviorist, following in Watson’s footsteps. He focused on  observable behavior • Skinner did not deny the existence of internal, mental events but he redefined them as  private events and did not think that they should be given special status when explaining  behavior • Skinner stated that: organisms tend to repeat responses that lead to positive outcomes,  and they tend not to repeat responses that lead to neutral/negative outcomes Psychoanalytical Movement ­ Freud’s movement • Focused on the unconscious mind – the “unconscious” contains thoughts, memories, and  desires that are well below the surface of conscious awareness but that nonetheless exert  great influence on behavior • Major departure from prevailing belief that people are fully aware of the forces affecting  their behavior  • Freud made disconcerting suggestions that people are not masters of their own mind • Model of the mind includes: conscious, pre­conscious, and unconscious • It was very controversial • Unconscious conflict relates to sexuality – Freud proposed that behavior is greatly  influenced by how people cope with their sexual urges (this was at a time when people  were far less comfortable discussing sexual issues) • Freud was a very radical thinker and due to his controversy only gained influence very  slowly  Humanistic Movement • Started in the 1950s in an opposition to psychoanalytical thinking and behaviorism (they  considered them to be dehumanizing) • Lead by Maslow and Carl Rogers • They emphasized growth, freedom, and the uniqueness of individuals • Have an optimistic view on human nature  • Both Rogers and Maslow stated that to fully understand people’s behavior, psychologists  must take into account the human drive towards personal growth  • Humanists argue that psychological disturbances are the result of thwarting uniquely  human needs  7 Themes in Studying Psychology 1) Psychology is empirical (“of the senses” – the premise that knowledge should be  acquired through observation) 2) Psychology is theoretically diverse (psychologists do not just collect isolated facts;  they seek to explain/understand what they observe. Therefore, they must construct  theories) 3) Psychology evolves in a sociohistoric context (interconnections occur between what  is happening in psychology and what is happening in society) 4) Behavior is determined by multiple causes (behavior is very complex; most aspects of  behavior are determined by multiple causes) 5) Behavior is shaped by cultural heritage  6) Behavior is influenced jointly by heredity and environment 7) People’s experience of the world is highly subjective  Critical Thinking • Does not blindly accept arguments • Looks for logical consistencies and sound arguments • Assesses conclusions • Evaluates evidence  Scientific Method Used to simply make observations Theory An explanation that integrates principles Hypothesis  o Typically expressed as TESTABLE predictions o Often induced by a theory o Allows to accept/reject/revise theory Operational Definitions  o Very specific descriptions of what is being studied o Used to clarify what is meant by each variable  o (Eg. Comparing depression and low self esteem – we would have to have a clear  definition of depression and low self esteem) Research Process o Start with theories – then hypothesis – research – generate and refine initial theory Descriptive Methods  o When researcher cannot alter variables o Uses: naturalistic observation, case studies, and surveys Naturalistic Observation  Nothing is altered that is being studied  Researcher engages in careful observation of behavior without intervening  directly with the subjects   (Eg. Recording/observing schoolyard bullying) Case Studies   In­depth investigation of individual subject  Well suited for studying certain phenomena  Survey Method  Issues involving self report (asking people for information)  Researchers use questionnaires/interviews to gather information about  specific aspects of participants’ behavior   Problems: people can lie, limited
More Less

Related notes for PS102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit