Study Guides (247,929)
Canada (121,167)
Psychology (680)
PS260 (45)
Midterm

Midterm1notes.doc

10 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS260
Professor
Eileen Wood
Semester
Fall

Description
PS260 Midterm 1 Notes Chapter 1: The Science of the Mind Cognitive Psychology: concerned with how people remember, pay attention and think. A larger range of our thoughts, actions and feelings depend on previous knowledge the  reader already has. H.M(Henry Molaison) patient who has amnesia cannot form new memories, so without  memory, he has no sense of ‘self’  Introspection: Wundt and his student Titchener began the study of experimental psychology in the  1800’s.  For the first time, psychology was a study separated from biology and  philosophy. Focus was on conscious mental events. Introspection: process in which the person looks ‘within’ to observe and record  Problems with Introspection: Mental activity is unconscious and cannot be fully shared, as it is subjective and  not testable.    Very UNSCIENTIFIC Behaviorism: As introspection failed, the desire to be more scientific led to changed in the scientific  field.  It occurred during the first half of the twentieth century.   Focus switched to stimuli and behaviors that could be studied.   Behaviorism:  behavior changes in response to stimuli, i.e rewards and punishments. Influential figure was: John B. Watson. Intrigued with the study of babies behavior and  learning. Problems with Behaviorism: Behavior cannot be understood only in terms of stimuli and responses, and it also  depends on perception, understanding, interpretation and strategy (how the experiment is  conducted; it should always be the same) However, studying mental events are necessary to understand behavior. Cognitive Revolution:  (about 50 years old) Started around the 1950’s­1960’s Study mental events, but do so indirectly.  Stimuli and visible events are measured.  Hypotheses are developed and then further  tested to gather measurable events. Immanuel Kant introduced the transcendental method.  You begin with observable  tasks and work backwards.  Working Memory: storage system where information is held while being used.  Span Test: determine how long you can hold working memory. Performance on a span  test can measure the underlying of working memory system. For the people who are mute, instead of having an ‘Inner voice”, they have an  “inner hand”.  Most confusion happens not from sounds that sound alike, but from signs  that look alike.  Working­Memory system: not a single entity. Central executive coordinates the activities  and another assistant is the Articulatory rehearsal loop. Articulatory Rehearsal Loop: Subvocalization: silently pronouncing words. Phonological Buffer: auditory image of words. Plays an important role during development as we learn new vocabulary. Note: During span test, confusions are made from sounds that sound alike. Concurrent articulation: reduces memory span dramatically.  Needs to incorporate speech  mechanisms. Anarthria: inability to produce overt speech.   Muscle movement is not needed for subvocal rehearsal.  Uses same regions during  speech production and comprehension. Cognitive Neuroscience: study of biological basis for cognitive functioning.  Neuropsychology: concerned with how various forms of brain dysfunction influence  observed performance. Chapter 2: The Neural Basis for Cognition Capgras syndrome illustrated that different parts of the brain perform different jobs.   Realized in the 1900’th century by studying patients with lesions to the brain. Phineas Gage who was a victim of a railway construction in 1848 had a metal penetrate  through his brain (frontal lobes) which resulted in cognitive and emotional changes.   Localization of function:  ­study of people with brain lesions in comparison to healthy  people. The brain has three principle regions: Hind Brain: atop of spinal cord; regulates level of alertness; includes cerebellum  which coordinates movements and balance along with sensory and cognitive roles Midbrain: above hindbrain; coordinates movement (especially eye); regulates  pain Forebrain: parts of brain visible from the outer surface; has cortex  which is a  thin convulated sheet of tissue, and a variety of subcortical structures. • Thalamus • Hypothalamus • Limbic System o Amygdala o Hippocampus Cortex: divided into the left and right hemispheres by longitudinal fissure. Divided into anterior and posterior regions by the central fissure. Commissures :  thick bundles of nerve fibers; connects the two hemispheres; largest is  corpus callosum.  Cerebral Hemisphere is divided into four lobes Frontal lobes Parietal lobes Temporal Lobes Occipital Lobes  Computerized axial tomography (CT)  Positron emission tomography (PET)  Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)  Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) When viewing images of faces, the fusiform face area (FFA) is active.  When  viewing images of houses, the parahippocampal place area(PPA) is active. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: used to ask whether an area of the brain is  necessary for the task.  Primary projection areas: arrival and departure points for information entering  (sensory) and leaving (motor) the cortex.  Rest of cortex has been considered association  cortex.  Located in the posterior frontal lobes. The primary somatosensory projection area is located in the anterior parietal lobes. The primary auditory projection area is located in the superior temporal lobes. The primary visual projection area is located in the occipital lobes. Cortical maps represent sensory or motor information in an orderly manner. Cortical space is assigned disproportionately; Greater sensory acuity or motor precision is  associated with larger cortical representation The Visual System Retina: light sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye.  Visual processing and  analysis begins here.  Patterns of Lateral Inhibition between neighboring cells of the  retina leads to edge enhancement. Lateral Inhibition: Cell C is more inhibited than Cell B. Photoreceptors: found in retina Rods: Colour blind, higher sensitivity; lower acquity; found in the periphery of  the retina. Cones: lower sensitivity, colour­sensitive, higher acuity, found in fovea. Neurons that communicates information from the retina to the cortex:  In the eye: Photoreceptors Bipolar cells Ganglion cells and the optic nerve Thalamus: Lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) Cortex: V1, the primary visual projection area, or primary visual cortex, located  in the occipital lobe  Parts of a Neuron   : Dendrites: detect incoming signal Cell Body: contains nucleus and cellular machinery Axon: transmits signals to other neurons. Communication between neurons is done by Chemical Signals.  Neurotransmitters: chemicals released by one neuron to communicate with another  neuron.  Space between the two is called a Synapse.  If post­synaptic cell reaches threshold, and action potential is fired down to axon,  releasing neurotransmitters that affects the next neuron. Receptive Field: kind of stimuli that neuron best responds to.  Has a Center­surround  organization.  (Reacts best in the center) Parallel Processing: Different steps of kinds of analysis occur at the same time.  Parvocellular cells have smaller receptive fields and tend to continue firing  as long as the stimulus is present.  Magnocellular cells have larger receptive fields and respond more strongly to  changes in stimulation. Serial Processing: Steps are carried one at a time.  What System: concerned with identification of objects; oc
More Less

Related notes for PS260

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit